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ian61

mercury transit youtube live feeds???????

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We are hoping to observe the transit in school (Don’t panic - we have done several transits and partial eclipses in the past so we are fine on the safety aspects - thanks). However does anyone know how I can get hold of some links to use in advance of the day that we can use to put some professional feeds up on the large screen tellies we have linked up to the computer systems these days – I am told that links on YouTube are the easiest to handle on the slightly clunky system we have to control them.

My question comes from reminiscing with colleges that my daughter and I had stayed up to watch first contact of the last transit of Venus live from Hawaii before swapping to Mt Wilson. (We were also up before dawn on top of the local hill fort as the sun rose having lugged an old 4” reflector up there.) Of course at the time we were just browsing through the internet not taking good note of sites we were on.

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I think Slooh usually have live feeds of this sort of thing.

Dave

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Thanks - A quick looks suggests you may be right - I will look more when I have some time tomorrow.

Ian

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Thanks from me too.

We're hoping to observe, but if the weather isn't great, a back up plan is always a good idea. :)

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Slooh is indeed one of the best options I can think of. I watched the last transit of Venus on Slooh with the kids, as we were clouded out here. The previous transit of Venus I captured on film

I posted a very rough video of the last transit of Mercury in Ca-K here:

 

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