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Kn4fty

Sikhote Alin meteorite

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On February 12, 1947, the skies of eastern Siberia lit up as one of the largest witnessed single meteorite falls occured. Shining brighter than the sun, it came from the northern sky at an angle of 41°. Low in the sky with a flash and a deafening explosion, the bolide shattered at 5.6 km above the ground. 23 tonnes of iron showered the area and left over 120 impact holes. The meteorites show regmaglypts or thumbprint like depressions. The meteorites tend to have ragged, twisted, and distorted surfaces due to the low altitude break up. 

This particular sample was obtained from the observatory in Cincinnati Ohio.

Rob

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Interesting. I looked round for more about this meteorite event. These two articles are interesting; the first seems to have been poorly translated into English:

http://www.topo.biz/2013/02/sikhote-alin-is-an-iron-meteorite-that-fell-in-1947-on-the-sikhote-alin-mountains-in-eastern-siberia/

https://www.catchafallingstar.com/sainformationa.htm

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Very interesting articles. Thanks for posting. Next time I'm at the observatory, I'm gonna obtain some more meteorites. I've always wanted to collect them, but most are way out of my price range.

Rob

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Hi Rob, here's my example of Sikote-Alin, it's a nice lump of twisted jagged iron shrapnel and is very heavy.

 

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7 hours ago, Debo said:

Hi Rob, here's my example of Sikote-Alin, it's a nice lump of twisted jagged iron shrapnel and is very heavy.

 

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Very nice!  Mines pretty heavy too. A lot heavier than I expected. I want to get a couple more pieces of it.

Rob

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It's interesting to see the wide variety of individual samples. Some of my readings explain how the initial breakup at high altitude spawned smaller fragments that were still travelling fast enough to continue to melt and contort. Others were produced by explosive fragmentation at lower altitude, those are the sharp edged, very irregular specimens. And a whole array of meteorites in between!

These things, like the recent Chelyabinsk event, have a habit of missing highly populated areas. Lets hope it stays that way.

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Interesting in the difference, I note that @Debo's sample is far from a Micro Mount many of us own, very nice indeed.

You keep collecting @Kn4fty, I love these 'bits of old car park' as my dear wife refers to them as.

By the way I started a 'Show Us your Meteorite' thread a while back; 

I set it up hoping folks would set it running like the' What Did the Postman bring?' thread, but alas not the case so far.
Be nice to get you both posting into that thread and give it some life again 😘 
 

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Nice specimens of Sikhote Alin folks. My own bit looks more like Debo's to look at but a smaller piece. I used to have a wonderful 200 gram chunk of SA with reglamypts, a roll over lip and other flight markings. I sold it a few years back to buy more astro stuff though :rolleyes2:

I've been building up another meteorite collection recently - I'll have to post some pics. I'm up to 20 different types now.

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If you ever get the chance to visit the Natural History Museum in Vienna, it has (I believe) the world's largest collection of meteorites. I was fortunate enough to be passing through a few weeks back and came across it by chance. I don't recall whether it had samples of Sikhote Alin but it wouldn't surprise me. (The museum also has an amazing collection of rocks/minerals which is what drew me to it in the first place.)

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