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PhoTenix

Telescope recommendations needed please ?

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1 hour ago, happy-kat said:

Depending on your personal situation things to consider might be observing position. It might be easier to observe if the eyepiece is positioned at the bottom of the telescope as this makes it moved around less then day a telescope has the eyepiece on the top side. Reflectors are on the top side whereas mak, sct and refractors are at the bottom. I like to sit to observe and using a telescope with the eyepiece at the bottom has the edge on comfort. 

Thank you. See its these things that I know nothing about. I would be sitting down too. 

Are there specific scopes that I should consider then ? 

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Posted (edited)
37 minutes ago, Rob Sellent said:

Wow, Bristol...home of Bansky, Massive Attack, Tricky, Portishead, Gloucester Road, Park Street, Montpelier, Stocks Croft, open farms, amazing cafés, bars and people. That whole area (Somerset, Avon) is one of my favourites in the whole of all my travels around the UK. I haven't lived in England for getting on for 30 years, but fond memories, or the gradual disappearence of them :drunken_smilie: live on.

It might be tricky for you but it might be an idea to drop a line to BAS in Bristol and ask to attend one of their open nights? I'm sure you'll find really friendly folk who can show you their scopes and you'll be able to get a feel of them and the kind of things you'll be able to see? If I'm not mistaken, @Johnis a member and is also one of the most respected visual observers not only in the UK but in the English speaking world.

Yes I did look at BAS last night. 

And I live just off Gloucester Rd 😂 and my Dad knows Massive Attack ☺️

And I've lived up country, all over Devon, Cornwall and lived in Australia, bit Bristol is the Best ☺️

Edited by PhoTenix
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depending on how high you are seated relative to the scope, a refractor/SCT/MAK may suit better then, tho a refractor can have a big range of movement when looking higher toward azimouth, depending on the length of the OTA. My refractor is 1M long so essentially 45-50mm from the pivot point to the eyepiece to give an idea. MAK/SCT are much shorter so less of a range to swing through.

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7 minutes ago, DaveL59 said:

you often see pics on the bay where the little finder scope is fitted pointing the opposite way from which it should be. The finder should be the other way round from what's shown in that pic 

See I wouldn't know the difference 🤦‍♀️😂

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2 minutes ago, DaveL59 said:

depending on how high you are seated relative to the scope, a refractor/SCT/MAK may suit better then, tho a refractor can have a big range of movement when looking higher toward azimouth, depending on the length of the OTA. My refractor is 1M long so essentially 45-50mm from the pivot point to the eyepiece to give an idea. MAK/SCT are much shorter so less of a range to swing through.

Everything you just said may have been Swahili 😳🤦‍♀️🤷‍♀️ 

How do I learn all this stuff :blush:

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I personally tend to aim observing to angles that are easier to look at for me and just would wait for stuff to come to me as everything moves eventually

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Posted (edited)

I'll be honest here and say I'm new to scopes myself so not long into the hobby, moved up from binoculars after collecting and restoring a few (lot). But a chunk of reading, looking at what's out there and checking forums and reviews, then taking a punt based on that... Most of mine are TAL, they're v solidly made and low cost with some restoration needed on the reflectors (paint in the main). The refractor on the other hand is in v nice condition, all are 2003 vintage or earlier and likely in 20+ years will still be going strong. I'm sure the skywatcher will be fine too but feels so thin in comparison lol.

Another thought springs to mind, not wanting to be too personal or intrusive, but have you considered the tripod legs relative to your situation? Could be that they get in the way a bit for comfortable access to the eyepiece where a pier type mount may work better for you?

Edited by DaveL59
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The heritage 130p is a lot of telescope for the money and can be carried in two halves if needed and each but is around 3 kilos.

It can be used from the ground though you would need to be able to lean forward or perhaps sit the mount on top of an upturned bucket. And then move around the telescope as you change observing direction.

If you are needing to observe through an open window and not getting outside then a reflector is least appropriate as you would probably struggle to look through the eyepiece as easily. Observing from inside adds it's own problem with heat from the house likely to cause less steady images but doing something will see more than doing nothing I think

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Bristol Astronomical Society meet off Gloucester Road on Friday evenings. Here is the current programme - the "scope surgery" on 22nd November might be of interest as it's aimed at those who have got a scope that they are unsure about using and those who are thinking about getting one.

http://www.bristolastrosoc.org.uk/www/pages/programme/programme-20192020.php

Here is a bit more about coming to our meetings:

http://www.bristolastrosoc.org.uk/www/pages/programme.php

 

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14 minutes ago, happy-kat said:

I personally tend to aim observing to angles that are easier to look at for me and just would wait for stuff to come to me as everything moves eventually

Ok got you ☺️

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What's your light pollution level like, do you know the Bortle scale of where you live.

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13 minutes ago, DaveL59 said:

I'll be honest here and say I'm new to scopes myself so not long into the hobby, moved up from binoculars after collecting and restoring a few (lot). But a chunk of reading, looking at what's out there and checking forums and reviews, then taking a punt based on that... Most of mine are TAL, they're v solidly made and low cost with some restoration needed on the reflectors (paint in the main). The refractor on the other hand is in v nice condition, all are 2003 vintage or earlier and likely in 20+ years will still be going strong. I'm sure the skywatcher will be fine too but feels so thin in comparison lol.

Another thought springs to mind, not wanting to be too personal or intrusive, but have you considered the tripod legs relative to your situation? Could be that they get in the way a bit for comfortable access to the eyepiece where a pier type mount may work better for you?

Thank you. Really appreciate all this advice. I'm not in a wheelchair...... yet 😂 but thank you for thinking of that as I wouldn't have ! 

12 minutes ago, johninderby said:

Thank you ☺️

6 minutes ago, happy-kat said:

The heritage 130p is a lot of telescope for the money and can be carried in two halves if needed and each but is around 3 kilos.

It can be used from the ground though you would need to be able to lean forward or perhaps sit the mount on top of an upturned bucket. And then move around the telescope as you change observing direction.

If you are needing to observe through an open window and not getting outside then a reflector is least appropriate as you would probably struggle to look through the eyepiece as easily. Observing from inside adds it's own problem with heat from the house likely to cause less steady images but doing something will see more than doing nothing I think

Thank you. This advice is great honestly. Giving me a lot to think about ☺️

4 minutes ago, John said:

Bristol Astronomical Society meet off Gloucester Road on Friday evenings. Here is the current programme - the "scope surgery" on 22nd November might be of interest as it's aimed at those who have got a scope that they are unsure about using and those who are thinking about getting one.

http://www.bristolastrosoc.org.uk/www/pages/programme/programme-20192020.php

Here is a bit more about coming to our meetings:

http://www.bristolastrosoc.org.uk/www/pages/programme.php

 

That's brilliant thank you. Can I just turn up or do I have to join beforehand? 

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4 minutes ago, happy-kat said:

What's your light pollution level like, do you know the Bortle scale of where you live.

I've no idea but I'm assuming I can look it up somewhere! 

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Binoculars can be great to use as DSO are in general grey fuzzy blobs just they get bigger and perhaps easier...to find. I recall observing comet Lovejoy using binoculars and it was fun and challenging finding it each night as it moved. Jupiter's main 4 moons can also be picked out, I use 8*42 to keep the weight down for hand held.

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7 minutes ago, PhoTenix said:

Thank you. Really appreciate all this advice. I'm not in a wheelchair...... yet 😂 but thank you for thinking of that as I wouldn't have ! 

Thank you ☺️

Thank you. This advice is great honestly. Giving me a lot to think about ☺️

That's brilliant thank you. Can I just turn up or do I have to join beforehand? 

At the bottom of the 2nd link there is some information about that. Your 1st visit is free. For subsequent visits we ask for £3 a session unless you decide to join.

The "Clear Outside" webpage is free to use and gives lots of info about your local observing conditions if you put them into it. This link is set up for my home town, Portishead but you can change it to suit your location:

http://clearoutside.com/forecast/51.48/-2.79

An estimate of your Bortle Scale conditions is in the yellow box below the location details.

 

 

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1 minute ago, happy-kat said:

Binoculars can be great to use as DSO are in general grey fuzzy blobs just they get bigger and perhaps easier...to find. I recall observing comet Lovejoy using binoculars and it was fun and challenging finding it each night as it moved. Jupiter's main 4 moons can also be picked out, I use 8*42 to keep the weight down for hand held.

I wanted to try binoculars but I cannot hold my arms up for long at all  (as silly as it sounds) unless I had a table under my elbows, due to the crap that I have ! 

But seeing Jupiter's moons must be awesome. I have a fascination with Jupiter ☺️

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2 minutes ago, John said:

At the bottom of the 2nd link there is some information about that. Your 1st visit is free. For subsequent visits we ask for £3 a session unless you decide to join.

The "Clear Outside" webpage is free to use and gives lots of info about your local conditions if you put them into it. This link is set up for my home town, Portishead but you can change it to suit your location:

http://clearoutside.com/forecast/51.48/-2.79

An estimate of your Bortle Scale conditions is in the yellow box below the location details.

 

 

Brilliant. Class 6 bortle 🤷‍♀️ is that right ? 

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Just now, PhoTenix said:

Brilliant. Class 6 bortle 🤷‍♀️ is that right ? 

Here is a bit more about the Bortle Scale:

https://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-resources/light-pollution-and-astronomy-the-bortle-dark-sky-scale/

Depending where you are in Bristol it can vary from Bortle 6 to Bortle 9. Local street lights, security lights and housing and industrial lights have a big influence.

 

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Just now, John said:

Here is a bit more about the Bortle Scale:

https://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-resources/light-pollution-and-astronomy-the-bortle-dark-sky-scale/

Depending where you are in Bristol it can vary from Bortle 6 to Bortle 9. Local street lights, security lights and housing and industrial lights have a big influence.

 

It's now saying Bortle 5 ! 😂

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13 minutes ago, PhoTenix said:

I wanted to try binoculars but I cannot hold my arms up for long at all  (as silly as it sounds) unless I had a table under my elbows, due to the crap that I have ! 

But seeing Jupiter's moons must be awesome. I have a fascination with Jupiter ☺️

A monopod and bracket for the bino can help a lot and not add much cost or weight if you want to try the bino route first :)

A parallelogram rig for binos can make things even better tho at a cost, of course.

Add a lounger type chair so you aren't craning your neck esp now its getting colder and you're started out at reasonable budget till the right scope comes along...

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5 is not bad - most of my observing is done under Bortle 5 skies. 8 and 9 are where it gets tough !

We (BAS) have run observing sessions on the Clifton Downs and it's OK as long as you stick with brighter targets. Our observatory is about 7 miles south of Bristol where it's around Bortle 5.

 

 

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