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J47

Questions on double star Sirius through my Nexstar 4se

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Hi my name is Jay, new to all and any forums, lol. Not sure where to start so here I go. I have a few questions about Sirius the double star while observing through my Nexstar 4se telescope using a 2x Barlow and my neximage burst color. While I was able to capture quite stunning results of the star Sirius, this morning before sunrise, I was curious though as to if I might have incorrectly focused my scope on the star or if this image is a clear image of the star? I will attach a brief 7-8 second video I took this morning. It was the first time I had gotten to focus my scope on the star as it kept drifting before but I solved the drifting issue as a result of improper anti-backlash. But now back to the video, was wondering if any of you could help determine if I properly focused on the star because from what I see the star appears to be in the shape of an out-of-control atom in the video and at the center it is black, is this the observing of a quasar? Thanks for all the help in advance if anyone stops by thanks for the time and efforts here's the video.

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Sorry Video won't load, but no - it's definitely not a quasar. Bearing in mind the most powerful optical telescopes on earth cannot resolve the closest stars to us (4 light years the Centauri group) as anything more than point sources of light; then that hopefully conceptualises why you wont see a spinning quasar in your 4 inch Mak, but from what you describe I can see where you are coming from. It would be pretty cool if it were the case.

I think what you are describing is atmospheric turbulence. The stars do wobble about a fair bit, especially lower one's nearer the horizon. If you imagine the mirage's and heatwaves that you get in the distance on really hot days - well that's kind of what happens in the atmosphere too. And a telescope has a lot of atmosphere to look through. All normal.

Edited by Mr niall
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