Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_2.thumb.jpg.72789c04780d7659f5b63ea05534a956.jpg

Recommended Posts

A quick sketch from the 1st September (sorry - date is wrong on the image). 

M15 was still fairly low in the east but the central condensation of stars really stood out, even in a 5.5inch scope. The bright field star intruding on the edge of the image was distracting. If I had a tracking mount I'd have banished it permanently!

A lot of the extended GC was on the threshold of vision and the resolved stars faded in and out. 

M15 will always have a special place for me as it was the first GC i ever saw 😍 

Thanks for looking. 

Jack

GreatPegasus.jpg

  • Like 17
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's amazing, Jack. I was out on the same evening observing exactly the same glob with my 4" 😀 Your drawing is very much exactly as I saw it :thumbright: I was wondering what mediums are you using for your sketches? It looks like chalk on black card but I imagine I'm mistaken.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Rob Sellent said:

That's amazing, Jack. I was out on the same evening observing exactly the same glob with my 4" 😀 Your drawing is very much exactly as I saw it :thumbright: I was wondering what mediums are you using for your sketches? It looks like chalk on black card but I imagine I'm mistaken.

Hi Rob. I always love the idea that different star gazers are training their telescopes on the same faint objects, miles apart!

The sketch was made with graphite pencils and a blending stump on white paper - then scanned and the colours inverted. I'd like to try positive sketching with chalk pens on black card - I posted a great link on this a while back ('The Mellish Method'):  

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Jack, 

I'm using black pencils on white paper (printing A4), blending stump,charcoal,chalks, pencil pens, brushes, scanned to becomes black / PC photoshop +- brightness - contrast  etc. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Pincs
      Hi I've got an 8" dobsonian and I just got a dslr to connect to it. Obviously there's no tracking so what kind of things can I capture. Will I be able to do dso and planets?
      Thanks
    • By SpaceDave
      I'm new to the astrophotography hobby. I have experience with astronomy. I am struggling to make decent deep sky images (other than M42). The images don't seem to have much definition or brightness despite a decent overall exposure time. See the below images. I have seen on this forum that people are able to take awesome images of the below objects with my same setup. Is anyone able to tell me if I am missing something, please? Do I need even more exposure time?
      I use a Celestron 6SE with unmodified Canon 600D. It has a goto alt az, no EQ. I use a bahtinov mask to focus. Both images were taken with the native focal length of 1500mm, no filters or eyepieces.
      The image of the Triangulum Galaxy is 180 x 15sec ISO800 images. The Crab Neb is 250 x 15sec ISO800 images. Both images had their appropriate flats, darks and biases (30 of each). I use SIRIL to stack the images, which I have had good success with M42 before (see below).
      Any advice would be appreciated!



    • By AstroRuz
      In what was my final image with the Optolong L-eXtreme filter before I had to send it back to FLO, I turned it over to Cassiopeia. I knew that the Lobster Claw nebula was hiding there somewhere by using Telescopius and framing it that way (since it doesn't show in Stellarium). I realised that with the field of view achieved by the 80ED, reducer and 071mc Pro I could fit no less than 4, possibly 5 or even 6 DSOs in one frame. I love this part of the night sky. 
      The final image is composed of 31 x 300 second exposures, gain 95 at -5c. I ended up using the wrong dark frames by accident to calibrate it, and in all honesty I was too lazy to go shoot the right dark frames and re-edit it. So I just cropped out any nasty parts and edited it as normal. Not great practice I know but I really didn't get enough time with this target anyway.
      Either way I'm sharing the result and I hope you enjoy it!
      Clear skies all, keep looking up & keep them cameras clicking
       

    • By melsmore
      First the disclaimer. This is my first attempt to sketch Mars, or indeed any planet. Also, it started to rain and I had to abandon it with some urgency (hence no orientation marker). I used a HB pencil and a blending stump. But I think I can see a couple of features that match Ade Ashford's app.
      The Wratten 21 filter improved the view enormously (although you may find that hard to believe looking at the picture) helping show the surface detail and improving the seeing. I tried it the day before in my 80mm refractor, but that just made the image too dim, but on the 115mm it was very good, so I recommend it to anyone with 115mm or larger.
      I tried sketching the moon (Plato) several years ago, but SWMBO pronounced it (I'll paraphrase her here) more Feline Anatomical than Selenographical. While this one may look more like a two year's old attempt at drawing a rabbit, at least no one can confuse it with the rear end of the cat. So regardless of the criticism I receive here, I'll give it another go tonight (weather permitting). 🧐

    • By Philip Terry
      Not as spectacular as M13 a few nights ago, but comes up nicely with Samsung Galaxy S10 and an 8" SCT. Conditions were a bit iffy.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.