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Kronos831

And there goes my eyepiece...

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Sooo after coming back from holidays(have been gone for a month and a half) i discovered that i had forgotten to use the lens caps to protect my Panaview 32mm from dust....

turns out, its dirty.Me having no idea what a "multiple element lens eyepiece " meant , learnt the hard way. I unscrewed the bottom part of the eyepiece and 2 lenses and a tiny ring came out... not knowing in how to put them in, tried a bunch of different ways, and still the eyepiece view was still bad.(couldnt even focus on daylight objects) after messing with it for a bit 3-5 more lenses came out. Now my 100$ eyepiece is totally screwed up and i have No idea how to fix it. I m panicking so much and i have absolutely no idea what to do. I hope i ddnt screw the lens up...

  if anyone thinks they can help me, i m gonna make a system in which you can tell me how to put the lenses back

So lets name the first group of parts depending on their place from left to right : A(The first lens ), B(the ring) and C( The Thrid lens) , now, these i have no idea how to place them correctly (have in mind that Is curved , if it gives you any information)

The next 4 pieces you see are D(The thick ring), E(The big lens) F (the other ring) and G(the final lens)

Here is a picture of each piece from both up side and bottom side

First will be up and second would be down

If anyone could give me instructions to as how i can put everything back together , i would be greatful

(Uploading pictures in a bit)

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Posted (edited)

Hi Kronos, have a read through  the thread below which suggests that this is the correct lens arrangement;

image.png.c9f9a6d31e0bbc89812b29b13c9e0272.png

 

 

Edited by lenscap
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thanks for the help!, however, when i tried to take a picture of one lens, it slipped of my hand and broke,so i guess there goes my eyepiece

lesson learned:Never take your eyepiece apart...

 

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14 hours ago, Kronos831 said:

thanks for the help!, however, when i tried to take a picture of one lens, it slipped of my hand and broke,so i guess there goes my eyepiece

lesson learned:Never take your eyepiece apart...

 

Just be more careful in the future.  The lower barrel often holds the lenses in the upper barrel in place, so remove it upside-down to prevent the upper lenses from falling out.  If you want to remove the upper lenses, support them with a wide dowel and flip it over and slowly remove the upper barrel.  When putting the stack back together, reverse the procedure and slowly lower the upper barrel over the assembled stack to avoid a tipped lens that can jam in the barrel and chip an edge.

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Try www.edmundscientificoptics.co.uk . They have a huge supply of lenses, so you might get a suitable replacement.

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