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Hi All,

I took this picture by coincidence while trying to take photo of a single cloud on the sky.

Is this Venus?

Thanks.

 

HalVanus11.thumb.jpg.426fb86c7c74077751e8b0c2f306f410.jpg

 

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Just now, Halil said:

Hi All,

I took this picture by coincidence while trying to take photo of a single cloud on the sky.

Is this Venus?

Thanks.

 

HalVanus11.thumb.jpg.426fb86c7c74077751e8b0c2f306f410.jpg

 

That’s a nice photo of a cloud.  Firstly that isn’t Venus but a lens flare from the Sun, light reflecting off the glass. Secondly be careful imaging directly at the sun like that 👍🏼

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Hi,

thank you for the quick answer, however if it is a lens flare, why in the photo taken a few minutes later it ise half visible behind the cloud?

BehindTheCloud.thumb.jpg.05d3956d9d10804ec0fe99cc221cdba4.jpg

LessVisible.thumb.jpg.d03fade1d83da86ae5928bf58445bdf0.jpg

Thanks.

 

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definitely a lens flare, possibly caused by something semi transparent on the lens?... one thing for sure is that it's not Venus.

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In the last picture, the ball shape is so visible. The picture was taken around 11:30 in Sunny Beach ,Burgas, Bulgaria. Can someone sent a sky map for that time and location?

We can compare the position of Sun and Venus.

Thanks

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Its really not venus mate,even if it was it would'nt show up like that,it would'nt be a disc it would be a point of light,it is a reflection.

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According to Stellarium, Venus is well to the left of the Sun at 11.30am from Sofia.

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It is definitely a lens flare.

Even if it was Venus, it would not appear as a disc, unless it is at superior conjuction, (i.e. far side of the Sun). Also it would not be that big when viewed with a camera lens. I have seen Venus during the day, oddly enough it was about 11:30am too, years ago when my local astro society had an open day.

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Yes I agree with all off you. It can't be Venus.

In the sky map for that time and location Venus is almost on the same spot with Sun.

SkyMapBurgas1130.thumb.jpg.25a8221401a8c83a13560d8bb42e5005.jpg

 

However what about the globe in last picture. It is on the same place with Mercury.

LessVisible2.thumb.jpeg.7b0ac1d1fe2974b3da0f540ad8e9f54f.jpeg

 

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Posted (edited)

Mercury is even smaller than Venus and difficult enough to see when  it is dark let alone during the daytime and you normally need a telescope or binoculars to see it unless you have VERY good eye sight.  I have seen Venus through a very powerful telescope during the daytime, but it was impossible to see with the naked eye. 

I can understand why you are trying to work it out, but take it from experienced amateur astronomers.  It does look like lens flare in the first one, but not so much the second one.  Maybe you got a balloon flying in the sky as it is getting smaller in each photo, and in front of the cloud in the 2nd photo. 

Carole 

Edited by carastro

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More lens flare.

Mercury is/was further to the right of the as viewed from Sofia, BG @11:30:00EEST...

405550719_Screenshot(8).thumb.png.e88dc85c6f4b6b3f3d873cfa0ba07920.png

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I'm so disappointed, they really don't look like lens flares.

There is still one question, if it is a lens flare why in this picture most of it is behind the cloud.

BehindTheCloud.thumb.jpg.d2b5c346074f1120c2225686dd68e183.jpg

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One question which we all seem to be forgetting to ask is... what camera/lens are you using?

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I apologize everybody for this. Now I took another picture and reproduced the same spot.

SunFlake.thumb.jpg.5b81022f96e3dc543fefff6f7e17dee5.jpg

  • Like 2

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Still lens flare.

At that image scale the "object" is probably many tens or even hundreds of times larger than Venus would appear.

Venus would also be a solid white colour and crescent shaped. You'd need a good telescope to see Venus that size and it would be the only thing in the frame at the required magnification.

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19 minutes ago, Halil said:

I apologize everybody for this. Now I took another picture and reproduced the same spot.

SunFlake.thumb.jpg.5b81022f96e3dc543fefff6f7e17dee5.jpg

No need to appologise,i have been at this for over 40 years and am still learning things everyday.

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Some iPhones obviously have a flare for this sort of thing. :smile:

  • Haha 4

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1 hour ago, carastro said:

Mercury is even smaller than Venus and difficult enough to see when  it is dark let alone during the daytime and you normally need a telescope or binoculars to see it unless you have VERY good eye sight.  I have seen Venus through a very powerful telescope during the daytime, but it was impossible to see with the naked eye. 

I can understand why you are trying to work it out, but take it from experienced amateur astronomers.  It does look like lens flare in the first one, but not so much the second one.  Maybe you got a balloon flying in the sky as it is getting smaller in each photo, and in front of the cloud in the 2nd photo. 

Carole 

Carole, 

It is actually easy to see Venus with the naked eye in full daylight, as long as you know where and when to look.

The way I first did it was when Venus was close to maximum elongation rising before the Sun (i.e. "morning star"). The trick was to stand in the same place and remember where it was in relation to a building or tree. I did this every hour or so and could see the planet from dawn through to past 1400 GMT.

I've also heard that it's possible to see Jupiter in the daytime, but I've not managed it yet! :)

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32 minutes ago, Rusted said:

Some iPhones obviously have a flare for this sort of thing. :smile:

Apologies for de-railing the OP's topic, but I do think @Rusted comment, as shown above, belongs here... 

😜

 

  • Haha 1

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