Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

Ruud

Moon 12 August 2019 - Gassendi

Recommended Posts

Yesterday the Moon was  low in the sky (in Scorpius), but he seeing was good and allowed magnifications up to  257x.  Gassendi was the most prominent crater on the terminator. Here's a painting of the scene.

The small Moon image (Stellarium) shows the location of Gassendi.

Gassendi-11Aug19-2100UT-klein.png.597a0b9f69401f7eb3d0aa6366eaa5d7.png795333499_GassendiLocation.png.f892f146710e5ac2afdb2a95f654dc2d.png

Thank you for watching.

 

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice sketch! The red dot on the terminator is a move I haven't seen before, very illustrative! Something I will try to remember when sketching my first sunspot, believe it, that time will come 😉

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely sketch. Im just getting into sketching. Lovely to take the time to look and study.

What black paper and white pencils do you use ?
How do you get enough light to sketch without affecting night vision ?

Regards

 

Edited by Fraunhoffer
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks people, for for your kind comments.

Hi Fraunhoffer, I make these on my computer with a wacom tablet, Corel Painter and Photoshop. I work from notes and partial sketches that have the details of the features I could see. From them, with the help of a reference, I make an underpainting in Corel Painter on the computer. Then with smearing and scratchy brushes, using pencil, oil paint, acrylic and charcoal (all mixed, whatever works) I make the painting. As I go along I compare the miniature version in the navigator window to the reference. Whenever I go seriously wrong I use undo.

Only the larger features in the result are realistic, but that's OK. I feel a sketch should be a personal interpretation and that's what I aim for. Photo realism is for the imagers. The observation takes half an hour or so, the work on the computer takes several more, but it's a nice thing to do. I listen to the radio and a podcast or two while I'm at it.

We also have real pencil and charcoal sketchers here and I hope they can provide you with a tip or two. My suggestion would be to draw a rough overview of the scene and several partial sketches at the telescope. After that I'd do the final sketch indoors with good light, sitting at a comfortable desk.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Ruud said:

Only the larger features in the result are realistic, but that's OK. I feel a sketch should be a personal interpretation and that's what I aim for. Photo realism is for the imagers. 

Think this nails it. The interpreting can vary, big scale realism. For me starting out with pencil sketching it's about not having too big expectations, it'll come to you. Good enough whatever it is, as long as trying to develop at some level.

Edited by viewer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By johnno0015
      An image created by the NASA visualisation studio of what a lunar eclipse would look like from the surface of the moon! Pretty cool right? If you want to get a better understanding of what is happening and why, you can checkout this article HERE which goes into the theory behind it all and also shows you what a solar eclipse would look like from the surface of the moon. 
       

    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      yesterday evening after doing the sketch of the three-day old moon, we had a wonderful twilight scene with Venus and the Moon over here.
      So I did a pastel sketch how I recalled it afterwards:

      Clear skies!
      Achim
    • By JoshHopk
      Hello all,
      This is my first post on SL, so please correct me if I have started this topic in the wrong place. I am also relatively new to astrophotography, so please ignore my naivety!
      I had some clear skies last week, so decided to do some lunar imaging with my new(ish) ASI224MC. I captured my frames in SharpCap as RAW24 AVI files, stacked in AS!2 and processed in Registax and Photoshop. When i got to sharpening in Photoshop, I noticed a sort of mosaic pattern over the image, which took away from some of the detail, and really ruined the image the more I sharpened. I did a quick search and it turned up with 'debayering'. This is a completely new concept to me and all of my attempts didn't seem to improve the image at all (perhaps I was debayering in the wrong order?). I have attached some images and also my some of my SharpCap settings in case they are of help.  
      COLOUR SPACE: RAW24
      CAPTURE ARE: 1304x976
      OUTPUT FORMAT: AVI files (*.avi)
      EXPOSURE: 0.29ms
      GAIN: 282
      Thank you in advance
      Regards, Josh.
       


    • By barkingsteve
      Transparency good, winds light, let's do this. C925 with the 294mc pro ( ir/uv cut filter ) best 30% of 1-2k frames in AS3. Lightly sharpened in registax and processed in photoshop.
       
      2 panel mosaic

      Plato and Montes Alps

       
      Clavius

      Montes Apennininus

       
      2.5x Barlow
       

       
      Decided to get some data with the 178 mono and 685nm filter
       










      M
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.