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Last week on august 5th we were treated to a coronal hole followed by some G1 auroral activity here in New Zealand.

Unfortunately I live a bit too far north to capture the spectacular Auroral images.

However, ever the optimist, I set my canon 6d with a Samyang 14mm lens up in my backyard and captured 300 or so shots (20 seconds at iso 3000) which I then sent through to lightroon timelapse.

I'm quite pleased with the result. Definitely some colour there.

 

 

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oops....wrong forum :( 

it was meant  to be in widefield  imaging forum.

can anyone assist me to move it to the correct forum please ?

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27 minutes ago, Andywilliams said:

oops....wrong forum :( 

it was meant  to be in widefield  imaging forum.

can anyone assist me to move it to the correct forum please ?

Sorted for you Andy. Great timelapse!

I had to look up what a coronal hole is. What effect does it have on the Aurora

EDIT I've hidden your other post which is now a duplicate, hope that's correct.

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You have some well trained clouds down in those parts.   They just sit on the horizon and shuffle about !!!!

Gorgeous timelapse.  Been a while since I saw the LMC.

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2 hours ago, Stu said:

Sorted for you Andy. Great timelapse!

I had to look up what a coronal hole is. What effect does it have on the Aurora

EDIT I've hidden your other post which is now a duplicate, hope that's correct.

Thanks Stu,

As far as I know the coronal holes have an effect of solar wind speed and therefore auroral activity.

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On 11/08/2019 at 10:48, Craney said:

You have some well trained clouds down in those parts.   They just sit on the horizon and shuffle about !!!!

Gorgeous timelapse.  Been a while since I saw the LMC.

The the clouds when there is a westerly are very well behaved indeed !

There are a range of large hills/small mountains under those clouds and it seems to keep the clouds at bay. 

A northerly however is a different matter all together 😂

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