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Hi all, 

Just wondering what magification is best to view nebulas in? I have lenses that view at 36x, 90x, 150x and then a barlow lens. 

I am trying to view the Eagle Nebula and the Omega Nebula, the Orion Nebula will be visible for me in December so looking for advice for that too.

 

 

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Generally low to medium powers so 30x or 90x. Some of the planetary nebulae are small so benefit from higher powers once you have found them.

UHC and O-III filters can make a big impact on nebulae observing so are well worth considering.

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Which scope do you have Matthew, and what are your skies like?

I would generally say quite low power, medium at most for the nebulae you mentioned. I recall observing them with a 4" refractor and never got above x60 and was quite happy. An OIII or UHC filter will help to pull the nebulosity out, and get to as dark a sky as you can.

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3 minutes ago, Stu said:

Which scope do you have Matthew, and what are your skies like?

I would generally say quite low power, medium at most for the nebulae you mentioned. I recall observing them with a 4" refractor and never got above x60 and was quite happy. An OIII or UHC filter will help to pull the nebulosity out, and get to as dark a sky as you can.

I have a Skywatcher 114/900mm EQ2 Reflector. I would say my skies are pretty good, I can faintly (very faintly) see the milky way where I am located, I am close to the center of my city though which I guess would have a big affect though I don't notice that much difference when I go out of the city into 'Dark Places'

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13 minutes ago, matthew12098 said:

I have a Skywatcher 114/900mm EQ2 Reflector. I would say my skies are pretty good, I can faintly (very faintly) see the milky way where I am located, I am close to the center of my city though which I guess would have a big affect though I don't notice that much difference when I go out of the city into 'Dark Places'

Well the scope should be capable of showing you these. As said, use lowish power, I would try your x35, and get yourself a filter if you can.

There should be quite a difference in the Milky Way when you go out to dark skies and get properly dark adapted. It can appear quite bright and detailed so perhaps you are not finding the best sites?

Anyway, let us know how you get on 👍

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I mostly use ES82 11m which gives me 136x. 

It is not only about magnification but also about exit pupil (focal legth of the eyepiece devided by focal ratio of your telescope). Generalyl larger exit pupil (lower magnification) gives brighter image, smaller - higher contrast. The sweet spot is around 2mm, or 16mm eyepiece with your telescpe, but the best way is to try for yourself and see what works best for you.

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Mathew

Welcome from across the ditch

With my 10" flex Dob, when out doing school, scout group presentations, I use a 17 wide angle, or 15mm wide angle eyepieces

The beauty of a wide-angle, when viewing Jupiter, which is overhead just after sunset, where you are, able to see the moons around Jupiterwider spread

Get nice viewing also of Saturn.

Other objects visible at the moment, is the Jewel Box, Southern Cross, Omega Centauri

I use app Skysafari, and shows you which nebula are visible

John

 

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Nebulae require very dark skies, usually some form of specialist filter, low magnifications, as well as observing experience, where one's eye can distinguish between tiny contrast differences, e.g. a very faint nebula on a greyish background sky.

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Low to medium magnifications.... it does depend of which nebula you want to observe.. for example low powers are needed for the Orion nebula, Omega Nebula and Carina Nebula but medium power for the eagle....

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