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Firas1

Andromeda will look bigger than the moon on August 2019

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Posted (edited)

Hi guys, I'm new here. 

So i have heard from this source: 

http://www.thescinewsreporter.com/2019/06/in-august-andromeda-galaxy-will-move.html?m=1

that the galaxy andromeda will be visible to the naked eye and look bigger than the moon. They said that it will happen in August, but didn't specify a day. 

Does anyone know anything about this? Or about how i kann see it? 

Thanks in advance and sorry if my grammar is bad 

Edited by Firas1

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Complete nonsense .... have a look at this thread, same text appearing all over the internet as far as I can tell ...

Comments in the thread should shed some light on the matter ...

 

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LOL, to the naked eye? will andromeda make a sudden flyby? where does this stuff come from? 

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Total garbage that it occurs every 150 million years... the andromeda galaxy is a naked eye object in dark skies and bigger angular size than the moon all the time...

When reading this "article".. or pharticle... I was looking for the link to send some money to guarantee the view, HAHA 😄 

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Hi, Firas1, and welcome to SGL.

Sorry you were decieved by the article, but there are plenty of real things to see in the night sky.

Enjoy the journey.

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Welcome to SGL @Firas1

Don't let this rubbish put you off, there is plenty of amazing stuff to see up there.

The really incredible thing is that the Andromeda Galaxy IS visible with the naked eye from a dark site and is actually SIX times bigger than the moon. If you get somewhere really dark, and allow your eyes to get properly dark adapted then with a pair of binoculars you can really start to see how big it is.

The Andromeda Galaxy is heading our way, but there is nothing special about this time, and its appearance won't change for a few billion years!

This image is a genuine representation of its size, although the outer reaches are very faint so are hard to see so it won't ever appear like this long exposure image.

m31abtpmoon_c720.jpg

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It always has a larger angular size than the moon and even my 50 year old eyes can just about make it out from a dark sky site.

We just need a decent power cut so we can all see it naked eye. 😈

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Thank you everyone for putting some sense into the journalistic sensationalism (is that a proper word?).

You got there before me.

The 'Science News Reporter is now in the 'must read when insomnia strikes' folder on my tablet.
That is along with the fake Apollo stories, Mars the size of the moon next year and Elvis in a spaceship!

Must go now. Getting ready for a lfat earth society meet later.

David.

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3 minutes ago, Carbon Brush said:

Elvis in a spaceship!

Ooo  when's that ? I'd hate to miss it 😂

Dave

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Well it is partially correct.

The Great Andromeda Galaxy ("Andromeda" is a constellation, not a galaxy! :) ) will be closer in August and it will be apparently bigger than the Moon!

 

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25 minutes ago, Paul M said:

will be closer in August

Yes, but not in an event which happens only once every 150 million years. That is reserved for clear nights 🤣🤣

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Thank you all for telling me the truth. 

I will still try to see andromeda knowing it is already visible. 

 

Again, thanks a lot 😊

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Where do these journalists get this garbage from?  

Firas1 you did the right thing and asked people who are looking at the night sky all the time and know what they are talking about.

I have yet to see it with the naked eye, even in a dark site, and even through a telescope you can only really see the bight middle of the galaxy, and may a slight hint of the spiral arms, but long exposure photography will reveal it in all it's glory. 

Carole 

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So the galaxy can be seen by the naked eye? Or should i use a specific type of binoculars? 

And how can i find it in the Night sky? 

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On 25/07/2019 at 22:53, Firas1 said:

Hi guys, I'm new here. 

So i have heard from this source: 

http://www.thescinewsreporter.com/2019/06/in-august-andromeda-galaxy-will-move.html?m=1

that the galaxy andromeda will be visible to the naked eye and look bigger than the moon. They said that it will happen in August, but didn't specify a day. 

Does anyone know anything about this? Or about how i kann see it? 

Thanks in advance and sorry if my grammar is bad 

FAKE NEWS.........🤨🤨🤨

You can't believe everything that's written🤓🤓🤓 Or can you? LoL 

Roger Or is it?  LoL

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It can be seen with any kind of binoculars even in moderately light polluted skies. Any star atlas should provide its location and the best time to see it - but you will need to be able to follow a star chart. At the moment it's in the eastern sky after dark.

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You need to find the Square of Pegasus (you will need a star atlas, planisphere or something).  

Or download Stellarium - free and excellent.

I'll see if I can post up a diagram.

Carole 

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M31 is easy naked eye from here (Dark end of Bortle 4) provided it's reasonably (More than about 15 deg) high. With bins I could see it even in Ruislip, and I remember a time when it was fairly easily seen in Acton, about 8 miles further in to London.

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Posted (edited)
On 25/07/2019 at 23:59, vlaiv said:

nonsense

Agreed!

But not all is lost. There's something which I believe to be accurate. The illustration at the beginning showing the relative size -if not brightness; I recall being unable to fit it across the dslr diagonal on our 130pds.

Cheers and clear skies everyone.

andromeda-scale.jpg.0e86fdaae3b6a9b57c3cbe9f73b39496.jpg

Edited by alacant

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Posted (edited)

Locating Andromeda galaxy.  

Screenshots from Stellarium and the 2nd one is annotated as a guide.  If you can find Cassiopeia which is quite distinctive by it's W formation then work down to the Square of Pegasus.  then follow the top left  "arm" to the 2nd star, then "up a bit".  

You will need quite dark skies to see it naked eye, I have never seen it naked eye, but binoculars will help.  It's very bright in the core, the spiral arms are not normally seen except in a very powerful scope or in camera long exposure. 

Look in the eastern sky after about 10.30, (Possibly 11.30 in Germany  if you are on different time to us.

HTH

Carole 

 

Location Andromeda.jpg

Edited by carastro
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I find this image very useful for star hopping to M31.

Just to repeat, the brighter parts are visible with binoculars from even quite light polluted skies, and with the naked eye from dark sites. I've seen it plenty of times when camping on the South Coast of the UK. With good dark adaptation ie no lights or phones for at least 30 mins, the longer the better, you really can see the true size of it through binoculars pr a widefield scope.

Andromeda-M31 (1).jpg

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Posted (edited)

I have to admit that for some time I struggled to find Andromeda. I knew where it was supposed to be, and it was big. 

Finally when I did find it, I mainly saw the central core. I'm in a fairly dark area, bortle 3-4. After finding it the first couple times, it becomes easier.

Also, dont be discouraged when you only see the core. After you let your eyes adjust, you will start making out the wispy outer areas.

Edited by maw lod qan

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I have slightly different method of locating M31 and M33 than given above (maybe it will be useful to someone):

image.png.e76714c0936ddbb4d3e4ba324da37630.png

My approach is to find Cassiopeia and then find string of 4 stars underneath it (all bright and can be seen even in quite a bit of LP). Going from left to right, identify 3rd star and then start "raising" by first finding single star and then pair of stars above (all marked in the image). M31 is just slightly "above" two stars. M33 is about the same distance as pair of stars, but in other direction ("down").

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3 hours ago, carastro said:

 then follow the top left  "arm" to the 2nd star, then "up a bit".  

 

Location Andromeda.jpg

To the letter this is the same way I do it!😆

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