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Hi all. Does anyone on here know of a little engineering shop, or have used one before, or even own a lathe!

I just want some spacers adjusted by turning some material off etc.

Cheers. David

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Depending how much material you wished removed. You could use a mirror makers method using a fine grit such as 400 Carborundum on a flat metal surface.  Simply by using random figure of eight strokes will remove  material from the spacers. As I said, how much removal required will determine whether this method  is suitable for the task. Might make your fingers sore too though.

Ron.

Edited by barkis
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Hi Ron thanks for the answer. That's a good idea. Trouble is it's 7mm I need turned off. Thanks though!

David

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Have a search for local machine shops, the smaller ones usually do this sort of thing.

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Ah!, You'd be at for a week taking 7mil. off. I thought perhaps it was tiny critical amounts you needed to shift.  I'm sure there are a couple of light engineering outfits in West Cumbria.

Ron.

 

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I'll send a pic shortly Ron and you can see if I have the right idea about this spacer or not!!

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I'm after making a camera adaptor. I bought a second hand Tak Epsilon 180 off here and want to fit my camera to it. An Atik. Both the silver and black parts have the same thread which fit the camera and the scope corrector. It's about 7.5mm too long. They slide together nicely as you see. I thought if I made it just the correct length, and tested it I could maybe secure it together with grub screws or even bond it permanently.

Edited by David Hardie

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Pity my Bro is not closer, he has a small engineering shop and has been known to do little odd jobs like this, but we are all the way down in Essex

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Is it the black part you need machined down.  I could do that for you, I have a lathe at home, or you can do it yourself if you wish. 

When you mentioned a spacer, I thought you meant a thin ring of metal requiring only a small amount of material. . Ron.

Edited by barkis

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If you decide to pop down to Carlisle, let me know when you want to come, so I can clear out my mountain bike, and lots of golf stuff cluttering my little workshop 😀.

 

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7 minutes ago, barkis said:

Is it the black part you need machined down.  I could do that for you, I have a lathe at home, or you can do it yourself if you wish. 

When you mentioned a spacer, I thought you meant a thin ring of metal requiring only a small amount of material. . Ron.

It's the shiny aluminium part which needs some off it. It would be great to use the lathe, it's been a while since I did some turning! It's actually what I did as an apprentice many years ago!! Do you have a clock to true it up? 😄

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IF Barkis can't help for any reason, I've got a well-equipped workshop, if you want to mark on it what you want taken off with a sharpie and post it to me with the return postage, I'll shorten it for you.

PM me for address.

I could fit a couple of grub screws as well.

Edited by Stub Mandrel
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35 minutes ago, David Hardie said:

It's the shiny aluminium part which needs some off it. It would be great to use the lathe, it's been a while since I did some turning! It's actually what I did as an apprentice many years ago!! Do you have a clock to true it up? 😄

Off it's length, or it's diameter?  I have a DTI guage somewhere, but finding it might be a nightmare😁.   

I have a case with a multitude of adaptors, there may be something among that lot that would solve your problem for you. You can have a rummage through that, might hit the jackpot. Failing that, we'll hit the lathe.

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I rented a pipe cutter to shorten a frac tube to install a alternative objective lens and that just worked splendid, just graduated pressure while spinning round and the cutting is precise and made easy. Pipe cutters come in different sizes and the larger ones can be rented, looks like you all may have this sorted but for others reading the pipe cutter thing is a good method just need a smooth surface for it's guide rollers...

                             Freddie.

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I think a pipe cutter will struggle beyond about 1mm wall thickness.

A neat job could be done by wrapping a sheet of paper around the outside - this will give a very accurate cutting guide, go over the end of the paper with a sharpie to transfer the line to the tube. Cut witha hacksaw just shy of teh line, then file it until it is neatly on the line.

It would be a nice job to finish with anodising.

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1 hour ago, Stub Mandrel said:

I think a pipe cutter will struggle beyond about 1mm wall thickness.

A neat job could be done by wrapping a sheet of paper around the outside - this will give a very accurate cutting guide, go over the end of the paper with a sharpie to transfer the line to the tube. Cut witha hacksaw just shy of teh line, then file it until it is neatly on the line.

It would be a nice job to finish with anodising.

The tube I cut was 1/8" wall aluminum I don't know the grade but think a slow hot knife trough butter would sum it well at that thickness, the cutter was rented for a couple dollars and intended use was for steel pipe up to 1/4".

 

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10 hours ago, SIDO said:

The tube I cut was 1/8" wall aluminum I don't know the grade but think a slow hot knife trough butter would sum it well at that thickness, the cutter was rented for a couple dollars and intended use was for steel pipe up to 1/4".

 

Ah, sorry, I didn't realise you meant those sort of heavy duty cutters.  Might struggle on such a short piece, plus the end would still need tidying up.

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13 hours ago, Stub Mandrel said:

I think a pipe cutter will struggle beyond about 1mm wall thickness.

A neat job could be done by wrapping a sheet of paper around the outside - this will give a very accurate cutting guide, go over the end of the paper with a sharpie to transfer the line to the tube. Cut witha hacksaw just shy of teh line, then file it until it is neatly on the line.

It would be a nice job to finish with anodising.

Don't use a new blade, use an old blade. Less clogging.

 

Glen.

 

 

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29 minutes ago, GlenM said:

Don't use a new blade, use an old blade. Less clogging.

 

Glen.

 

 

Or use cutting oil or paraffin, really help on sticky aluminium alloys.

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Have you seen the price of 5litres of paraffin😀

 

Glen.

 

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1 hour ago, GlenM said:

Have you seen the price of 5litres of paraffin😀

 

Glen.

 

If you are that tight, just rub a candle on the blade. 🙂

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