Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

Recommended Posts

On the 2nd of July I closed my curtains one night before I went to bed but, before they were shut I noticed a strange multicoloured light flickering low in the sky in the northern celestial hemisphere. I Thought to myself if that is a star it looks amazing. The next night (3rd of July) I decided to take another look at this multicoloured light which was still there, Only this time I used my binoculars, I was seeing blues, greens & reds. We have all seen stars by looking up into the sky but, I have never seen a star create multi colours before. It makes you feel excited inside and you think that no one else can see this until you tell them and share the same experience together. I believe I was looking at the Capella Star which is the brightest star in the constellation Auriga and your not kidding it is bright. I cant wait to have another look tonight to see if the multi colours are still there. I would like to have taken at picture of it but I am not setup to do that just yet as I am very new to star gazing. I wish someone here can confirm what I saw and to post a picture of it would be awesome. 

Nikon Prostaff 3s 8 x 42

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bright stars down low do appear to scintillate with different colours due to the thick layers of atmosphere the light is travelling through. The colours are not real but certainly look eye catching.

Welcome to the forum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Usman
      Hi,   I've recently received a pair of Bushnell 10x50 Legacy binoculars as a gift and while the image quality is generally very good, I've noticed an odd problem when looking at Venus or the Moon through the right eyepiece or through both the eyepieces together. In the case of Venus, there's a ray that emanates from it and goes at a certain, fixed angle. The ray moves in both directions depending on the movement of my binoculars and when I saw it the first time, I thought it was a shooting star. I tried rotating the binoculars and the ray's angle correspondingly moved with it; I looked at it through the right eyepiece but with my left eye this time but it was still the same. In the case of the Moon, it's a small white sphere that moves in a certain direction instead of a ray of light. Since this doesn't happen when I only look through the left eyepiece, I'm guessing there's a problem somewhere in the optics on the right-hand side of the binoculars.   Could you please help me figure out what might be causing this issue and how I can rectify it (if at all possible)?

      Thank you for your help.
    • By lyfestyle
      Hello all, my name is Paige. I am a college student and new to the stargazing community. I know all about the constellations and astronomy, but i’ve never bought anything to see the stars up close. I’ve read through the forum and come to the conclusions I want to start with some well built binoculars and eventually get into telescopes. The 7 x 50 seem to be the common starting point but I would love to get something with a bit more clarity, and preferably still handheld.  I’ve also read up on some binoculars already and the big brands that jump out are Celestron and Orion, so I would love some opinions on those because they don’t seem to be reliable in the long run. I only have one shot on a good pair and I dont plan on buying any other equipment until i’ve mastered the binoculars! Price range up to around $300 so any tips would be amazing!
      Thank you, happy sky watching 🌌
    • By fairyhippopo
      I wonder if observing star or planet in equator country is different from north hemisphere or south?
    • By Ken Mitchell
      Hi all,
      For a long time I wanted to shoot this frame, probably from the early days of my astrophotography adventure.
      Finally after all these years I managed to get a decent result of the 'stuff' between these two beautiful nebulae. Fairly happy with the image but always looking for improvement.
      I hope one day to redo this all with a mono camera and filters. 
      Apart from NGC1499 , M45 and the Baby Eagle Nebula no idea what else is in the picture. If you happen to have an idea feel free to educate me.
       
      Some info on image and capturing:
      Widefield Pleiades to California.
      Taken over 2 nights with a total of 11hrs 25min integration.  
      With a stock Nikon d610 and Nikkor 85mm 1.8 objective.
      Tracking was done with the Skywatcher Star Adventurer.
      Lights and all calibrations frames were stacked in DSS.
      Processing was done in Adobe Photoshop CC using Adobe Raw, GradientXterminator plugin, HLVG plugin, Nik software plugins and Photokemi action set.
       
      Ken

       
    • By onefistinthestars
      To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Sir Patrick's DSO catalogue, I've added the available Caldwells to my basic Marathon search sequence. 
      Those interested may be pleasantly surprised by how many of the additional treasures are only a short hop from a given (or en route to the next) Messier.
      The sequence for 40°N can be found at the SEDS Messier Marathon homepage or at my blog.
      Peace, Stephen
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.