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Posted (edited)

Hi everyone - it's been a while! 

This has been on my hard drive for almost 2 months and I finally got round to processing it...it was quite optimistic of me to try and image this from my Bortle 7-8 back garden, but I gave it a go! While the nebula itself is clear to see, all those gorgeous dust clouds surrounding it were extremely hard for me to capture from my location without a lot more integration time. I think I'll head to dark skies to capture this one next time, along with some more focal length!

LRGB shot with ASI1600MM Pro and WO Z73. 2.9 hours of integration time.

Full details here.

Thanks for looking!

470359695_NGC70232019-05-04(Resampled)-800x601.png.4c57bc9020e36ed8fe814e713694da85.png

Edited by eshy76
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Lovely backyard capture - hard to do a lot better than that without a dark site or much longer integration. Nice work! :)

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Pretty Amazing, I live not that far from you in Bromley, so I know what your skies must be like.  Would never have thought to have attempted this one from home, so well done.

Carole 

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Thanks to everyone for the kind words...I think this is the type of target that I would need an obsy for in my light polluted skies...just letting the rig pick up the photons night after night to build up integration time.

Alternatively a few hours at a dark site...

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Nice one, i was interested in the composition of this target and found this,

0000694.000&db_key=AST&bits=4&res=100&fi

I have only ever seen it Blue which i thought indicated Oiii but doesnt seem to be any!!

Roger

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1 hour ago, carastro said:

It's an LRGB target Roger.

Carole 

Yes i know but i was wondering what actually gases it contained,

Roger

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That is a fantastic image considering you location.  Beautifully processed.  You've managed to show the dust without blitzing the background.  I had a look at this a couple of years ago and gave up and my sky is Bortle 5.  Kudos!

On 04/11/2019 at 13:32, apophisOAS said:

Yes i know but i was wondering what actually gases it contained,

Roger

As far as I'm aware Roger there isn't any significant gas there.  The colour is produced by starlight reflected off the dust. 

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4 hours ago, MartinB said:

That is a fantastic image considering you location.  Beautifully processed.  You've managed to show the dust without blitzing the background.  I had a look at this a couple of years ago and gave up and my sky is Bortle 5.  Kudos!

Thank you! This was a clear night during galaxy season where there was nothing else worth shooting with my widefield rig...so I went for it....processing was tough as I had seen the beautiful dust-laden shots of the Iris from better skies, so I knew what I wanted to see, but it was clear that I couldn't push the background too far...

...I love all the nice comments...slightly odd that I posted this in June but it looks like the thread was unearthed by someone in November! I'll take it of course!

Edited by eshy76

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