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acr_astro

Pastel sketch of the H alpha sun, June 26th

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Dear all,

these days we have a sunny and hot summer over here. Today I tried to capture the "aura" of the sun caused by some dust in our atmosphere when doing the pastel sketch of the H alpha solar disc. I spent almost half an hour with the solar disc and its aura and then just 15 minutes for the proms and filaments. So here's the result:

20190626_Sun_H_alpha_small.JPG.022143f5d644a98e3996cc4b33fb064c.JPG

 

Telescope: Lunt LS50THaB600PT
Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
Date & Time: June 26th, 2019 /1030-1115 CEST
Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
Technique: red and orange Koh-i-Noor pastels and pastel pens on black Canson Mi-Teintes pastel paper
Size: 24 x 32 cm

Clear (and sunny) skies!

Achim

Edited by acr_astro
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    • By melsmore
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    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      compared to four days ago, the solar disc and the prominences looked a bit more interestingly varied. I could do a sketch during the lunch break:

      Telescope: Lunt LS50THaB600PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
      Date & Time: May 19th, 2020 / 1300-1330 CEST
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: red and orange Koh-i-Noor pastels and pastel pens on grey Canson Mi-Teintes pastel paper
      Size: 24 x 32 cm
      Clear (and sunny) skies!
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    • By acr_astro
      Hi all,
      as well today the sun is shining brightly here. I set up the Lunt to have a look at it, at first just for observing. However, somehow I cannot resist and have to do a sketch This time I've chosen reddish pastels on grey paper to better catch the color of the view in the eyepiece.

      Telescope: Lunt LS50THaB600PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
      Date & Time: May 15th, 2020 / 1400-1430 CEST
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: red and orange Koh-i-Noor pastels and pastel pens on grey Canson Mi-Teintes pastel paper
      Size: 24 x 32 cm
      Clear (and sunny) skies!
      Achim
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      this morning, before going off to work, I started the day with a lunar sketch of lunar sunset before sunrise at home. I had put the 5" MAK outside over night, so it was properly cooled.

       
      Telescope: Celestron NexStar 127 SLT
      Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 6.7mm/82°
      Date & Time: January 16th, 2020 / 0715-0745 CET
      Location: Home terrace, Dusseldorf Region, Germany
      Technique: Koh-i-Noor chalk, extra charcoal and whitecoal pens and pieces on Seawhite of Brighton black sketching paper
      Size: appr. 20x30cm
       
      Clear skies!
      Achim
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      yesterday evening I have chosen the lunar crater J. Herschel (named after British astronomer John Herschel from 19th century, the son of William Herschel) which exposed a pretty convexed floor in the rising sun. The crater has a diameter of about 150 km and lies at the northern "coast" of Mare Frigoris.
      The sketch starts with Harpalus in the South, then you can see the 24 km crater Horrebow (named after a Danish astronomer from 17th century) just at the southern rim of J. Herschel. At the northern end of my sketch we have the 71 km crater Philolaus.
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      Telescope: Celestron NexStar 127 SLT
      Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 14mm/82° (due to the poor seeing, I couldn't go for the 6.7mm/82°)
      Date & Time: January 6th, 2020 / 1845-1945 CET
      Location: Backyard, Dusseldorf Region, Germany
      Technique: Koh-i-Noor chalk, extra charcoal and whitecoal pens and pieces on Seawhite of Brighton black sketching paper
      Size: appr. 20x30cm
      And finally here's a photo of my observation place:

      Clear skies!
      Achim
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