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joe1950

Two Eyepieces at Once - Binoviweing

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Thank you so much Stu... and everyone! Interest has been wonderful for this topic. Often my topics are so bad I have to reply to myself, just for the numbers! 🥴.

111279945_Platoarea71019.png.63795f1d26205d454c6c80ab584045cc.png   798722680_StWall71019.png.d49831780f9d2530369855d7f7fdd419.png

I took a couple pix of the areas I was looking at last evening; the Plato area and the Straight Wall and Lunar Highlands. These are only single frame images taken with a handheld iPhone, so nothing special, no stacking or the like. I'm not an AP-er by any means. The images some of those folks get are unbelievable!

Thanks again Stu, and all! 

joe

Just an added tidbit about the Straight Wall.  I read a while back it isn't an actual wall, but rather a slope. Kind of disappointing, actually. It is a fault line, but not a straight drop. I can't recall the actual grade angle, but the article said if you were at the bottom of the wall, and helped by the lower gravity of the moon, you could walk up it if you were so inclined (no pun intended). I'd rather it was a straight drop. Much more alluring.

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7 minutes ago, joe1950 said:

Often my topics are so bad I have to reply to myself, just for the numbers!

🤣

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Great shots Joe. Quite often I take smartphone shots, handheld through one channel of my binoviewer because I don't want to mess around with the setup. It works surprisingly well!

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Thank you, Stu! It does work well. Though my hand shakes holding it since there is nothing to hold it against. I have one of those brackets and next time I'll use it.

6AM here! Can't sleep at night and can't stay awake during the day. My clock is out of sync.

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4 hours ago, joe1950 said:

Thank you, Stu! It does work well. Though my hand shakes holding it since there is nothing to hold it against. I have one of those brackets and next time I'll use it.

6AM here! Can't sleep at night and can't stay awake during the day. My clock is out of sync.

Try the technique I've been mastering taking photos of the AFOVs of eyepieces with my cellphone camera.  Put your thumb and index finger around the rim of the eyepiece.  Next, lower your phone until the field stop just pops into view and the image is centered.  Roll your thumb and finger to come into contact with the phone, and then raise and lower your phone using your finger and thumb to maintain a stable connection to the eyepiece and to keep it level and centered with respect to the eyepiece.  I couldn't get decent photos just trying to hover it above the eyepiece.  There are just too many variables at play (pitch, yaw, x/y/z placement) to get a good image.

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That sounds like a great technique, Louis! I will definitely do that next time I use the phone for images.

My hand was dancing all over the place and even when I had the moon in view it was moving all over the screen. So much for steady hands! I'm surprised a few came out with any sharpness at all.  I guess the brightness of the moon kept the shutter speed fast enough to freeze the motion, but I'd rather use your technique and take no chances!

Thank you very much Louis.

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I find flash usually freezes the image.  ⛈️

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12 hours ago, joe1950 said:

That sounds like a great technique, Louis! I will definitely do that next time I use the phone for images.

My hand was dancing all over the place and even when I had the moon in view it was moving all over the screen. So much for steady hands! I'm surprised a few came out with any sharpness at all.  I guess the brightness of the moon kept the shutter speed fast enough to freeze the motion, but I'd rather use your technique and take no chances!

Thank you very much Louis.

We use a Celestron NexYZ phone bracket for outreach photography, quick and easy to use and visitors are thrilled with their "selfie" images.    😀

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A flash of lightning usually freezes me as well, Rusted. You know, I've watched some vids on lightning. What an interesting topic that is. Seen in ultra slow motion, numerous 'feelers' come down from the cloud to the surface. When the best path is found, sometimes as close as 50' from the strike point, the main strike follows its path, and none of the others! Fascinating.

Peter, I have an adjustable bracket and they help a great deal, I just get lazy and do it the hard way. Also, I found an app that allows for full control of the focus, shutter and ISO. Called 'YAMERA' for iPhone. There are many others. I find the settings don't jump all over the place as they sometimes do when on auto mode.

Let me share one more observing session, from last night.

Conditions: Good transparency, 4-5/10 seeing with obvious image animation, Jupiter at 26° altitude, the moon a little higher, but only 10° to the west of Jupiter. Scope used was the Bresser 127mm Mak, f/15, Arctutus binoviewer, (2) 12.5mm Meade Super Plössls.

The moon had the boiling type seeing but the detail observed was simply outstanding at 152x. I was able to see 3 craterlets on the floor of Plato, although they were in and out; but definitely visible. They are not easy objects from my location.

Jupiter too exhibited exceptional detail, when seeing permitted. Both NEB and SEB had excellent detail and contrast. At the equator, some lower contrast detail was also visible.

Last year I used this scope extensively on Jupiter which was at about the same altitude. Good detail was observed, but nothing like the detail I witnessed during this session. It was noticeably better using binovision. I have to say, these results have me pretty much sold on the advantage of a binoviewer, even with a lower cost model, at least as seen through my old eyes and processed through my average brain.

 

My new 102mm scope is delayed an extra day. I believe UPS wants to drive it over more road ruts and potholes a little longer. Of the three major shipping companies, none of which are held in high esteem, they are the least favorite, IMHO.

The very best to all! Thank you for posting and reading!

joe

Update: 7/14

Now, the scope delivery is back on schedule! 

Supposed to be clear this evening. We'll see. The heat and humidity are oppressive. Typical for this time of year. And endless mosquitos, the New Jersey state bird, are waiting for anyone who ventures out, day or night. 

My next thought is to try binoviewing on the moon and planets using some light color filters to see how they react to using both eyes. With monoviewing, I have to say color filters have minimal effect in my experience. But possibly they would be better performers with a BVer.

The best for the upcoming week!!!

joe

Edited by joe1950
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I’ll report for last night and tonight, trying not to drag it on. 😄

Last night I tested a couple filters with the binoviewer viewing Jupiter. I really have to say I did not feel there was any advantage using them (medium blue and light yellow). 

I’m not a filter person anyway. It may require practice to notice differences, or maybe they work better in larger scopes, with more light.

Today, the new (to me) scope arrived! It’s a Celesrptron Omni XLT 102 ED. It’s very nice, good condition and sat okay on my Celestron Alt-Az scope. It’s an inexpensive but decent mount. With the 102 mm on it, the shaking and moment of inertia swaying were not bad at all.

I took it out tonight. Very hot and humid, and the bugs were everywhere. Seeing was 4/5 at best. Again, a lot of boiling and image animation. In fact, looking at Jupiter’s moons, they appeared to be moving around.

I did use the Binoviewer on the scope, had no problem with reaching focus, with plenty to spare.

The view of Jupiter was simply amazing. I was able to see more belts, more belt detail and detail between the belts. I was amazed. It was the best I’ve seen Jupiter in many, many years.

It’s still a grab and go scope. But I was correct that anything larger and/or heavier might be stretching the limit.

So, I’m very happy with it. I’ll post some photos.

Thank you,

joe

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Keep it coming Joe. We enjoy your enthusiasm. :thumbsup:

Congratulations on the fine, new addition to your armoury.

It sounds as if this planet, which you call Jupiter, actually exists behind our perpetual clouds.

I've also heard that there's a Moon, called Armstrong, somewhere up there too.

Can you confirm this? :smile:

 

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Thank you for the kind words, Rusted. You know, the last two or three weeks have seen an unusual number of clear evening skies! One in particular was extraordinary.  But we’ll pay! We always do. 😀

So, yes, I can confirm through the use of empirical observation, the existence of those two extraordinary and lovely objects.

What I can’t confirm and am growing suspicious of, Rusted, is the existence of that which is called the Milky Way! Now I have an open mind. I’ve seen photos of this. But even when the skies are totally clear, I’ve not seen it in decades! Not a trace. It may have existed at one time, but where did it go? 🥴

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Hi Joe,

I can confirm that The Milky Way is in safe keeping up here in Darkest Scandinavia.
Strangely enough, we discovered early on that most vehicles have headlights fitted by law.
So they don't need extra [street] lights just to see the way ahead on every lane and highway.
Nor is there any reason to light up the high street when only the homeless are there at night.  :wink2:

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