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MKHACHFE

Totally gutted at finding out about the planets positions from the UK for the next few years.

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15 hours ago, Demonperformer said:

Yes, but the rings will be practically closed in the early 2020s. The true splendour will be around 2030.

I suppose we can enjoy the challenge, and you need the 'thin ring' pictures to contrast with the open ring ones!

Can't believe I haven't had a pot-shot at Jupiter yet this year.

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16 hours ago, Demonperformer said:

Yes, but the rings will be practically closed in the early 2020s. The true splendour will be around 2030.

My 1st Saturn image was with the rings completely closed from 2010, dont laugh!!!!

 1623928928_2010_04.12Saturn.jpg.27b3206e601359f45d8c1c34a67f5c94.jpg

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This is the second time I've seen this. When I first  saw Saturn through a telescope( 40mm refractor)back in the winter of 1972 it was just south of the Pleiades. During the same time Jupiter was starting to get higher in Aquarius /Pisces which was lucky as at the time I lived near the centre of Edinburgh and the rooftops extended to -3 declination.I got a 60mm refractor in 1974 so had several years of great views of the 2 great planets. Luckily I moved to my present rural location in 1979 just as the two moved south of the equator and got my first reflector.The late 80's and early 90's was a lean time as it is now with Saturn scraping the southern horizon.When I acquired my first equatorial in 1993 Saturn rising through Aquarius and by the early 2000's was again riding high in Taurus. I well remember in the early hours of January 4th 2003 given the chance to see Saturn directly in front of the Crab Nebula. Having said that through my 150mm Newt the Crab was rendered invisible due to Saturn's glare.

So if your young enough Saturn's currant situation is not that serious, the time will soon pass believe me. And it does pass quicker  as you get older.😣  Saturn really is the Bringer Of Old Age!

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As I said in a post a few weeks ago, Saturn will not be at a favourable altitude for UK astronomers until 2030 or so.  And Jupiter not until 2024 or so. It is what it is.

What about the Moon? Fabulous object to observe and image.

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4 hours ago, kirkster501 said:

As I said in a post a few weeks ago, Saturn will not be at a favourable altitude for UK astronomers until 2030 or so.  And Jupiter not until 2024 or so. It is what it is.

What about the Moon? Fabulous object to observe and image.

Of course, as you said...it is what it is 

Still gutted...Almost as gutted as when i was  a kid on a camping trip to the desert outside Riyadh in 1986 to see Halley's comet and not a single teacher listening to me that what we were looking at through the class snotty, rich girl's telescope was NOT the comet, as that was not where it was in the sky.

I cant remember exactly what it was they were ogling, maybe M42, but was certainly not H's comet!..Then i went back to my tent sulking (read: crying), knowing i would probably be dead the next time it showed it's face again. 

Also, the next day, me and my friend got separated from the class as a zero visibility sand storm hit us as we were walking. The kindness of some Saudis who found us got us back to our group hours later. 

 

...ah the 80's...Health and safety? What is that? I was 11.

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I can feel the pain of you northerners... the only solace is that in 2030s the situation will reverse, and I'm dreading that moment, because thats when my son will be old enough to potentially really enjoy the views of Jupiter and Saturn, but the low altitude might make the details hard to see.

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Well that stinks.  Good reason to visit Southern hemisphere warm waters & sandy beaches.  June planet challenge appears Ibbo!, astroman001 and astroavani all tied for 3rd.   Unsure of other member but appears to be in 1st & 2nd, contest ends tomorrow.  :coffee2::coffee2:

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9 hours ago, Pete Presland said:

My 1st Saturn image was with the rings completely closed from 2010, dont laugh!!!!

 1623928928_2010_04.12Saturn.jpg.27b3206e601359f45d8c1c34a67f5c94.jpg

I'm not laughing ... mine was almost identical (taken in the same season).

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It is what it is guys.  No amount of us being hacked off about it is going to change anything. 

I'd settle for no planets and a bit of clear sky if anyone can make that happen? 😂

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3 hours ago, Demonperformer said:

I'm not laughing ... mine was almost identical (taken in the same season).

I miss those naive imaging in some ways. Manually tracking a planet, while trying to get the focus, exposure and then hit capture 🙂

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I made up a motor unit for my first scope with variable speed to track and managed to keep Saturn in the image sensor for several seconds. 130mm Newt with tripod and manual controls plus cheap webcam.  I was so delighted to see the rings 😁

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Jupiter moves quickly. And you get to learn a bit about each zodiacal constellation as it visits them yearly in turn.

It will only be another 2 or 3 years or so before it starts to get good again.

And although Saturn seems to take an age to move anywhere, at least its heading in the right direction for us northerners.

The sobering thing for me is that its next 'good aperitions' from around 2025 - 2040 will be my final good views of this beautiful planet.

I'm afraid i won't be around to see it complete another full orbit.

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Tubby Bear said:

 

And although Saturn seems to take an age to move anywhere, at least its heading in the right direction for us northerners.

The sobering thing for me is that its next 'good aperitions' from around 2025 - 2040 will be my final good views of this beautiful planet.

I'm afraid i won't be around to see it complete another full orbit.

 

 

 

I've followed Saturn around almost two orbits (since 1964), unfortunatley also be unlikely to see it around a third

John

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Posted (edited)

Jupiter is still there . Got up about 4 , to have a look with the scope. Just about make 

out the bands. My mate next door , joined me to have a look. First time he had seen Jupiter

through a scope. Not a lot to see. Better than nothing.

Edited by Grotemobile

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I had some great views last year, although I don’t think they were as low. It does mean having to take my kit up the road tiny father in laws for a better horizon.

I chopped back a thick bush that helps keep the neighbours lights at bay only to find Jupiter was still a bit too low.

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On 10/06/2019 at 13:08, Nigella Bryant said:

I began astronomy when I was 11 now 60, how young must you start, lol. 

I was 6. I'm now 45.

I'm just saying.

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I know guys!.. I feel the same being 50 this year. I've been into astronomy from 10 years of age (in a serious manner with a scope). I recall the amazing years in the early 2000's.

The way I see this (and will exercise as best as funds can) is to replace the small ED I owned with another ED/ Mak and travel to southern Europe and observe. Of course the reaming Planet appearances are limited being low, but don't stop trying!.

Astronomy is about pushing limits, we also know we do have those very occasional fabulous seeing nights. Plus plan to get out of the city/town to areas that have a dark, wide open site to observe/image.  The higher the better.

There's always a way to achieve your goals.

Best Wishes & Clear Skies

Rob

P.s As mentioned. Mars is looking ok for height at opposition next year on Oct 14th, and with only a 11% Moon!

 

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I've seen most of the planets. I tend not to spend many nights observing them. There are far more interesting things out there to observe.

 

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43 minutes ago, Rob said:

I know guys!.. I feel the same being 50 this year.

Ditto Rob!

This is how the sky looked early on in my observing career. If only I knew then what I know now, and had the scopes I have too.

Screenshot_20190613-152905_SkySafari 6 Pro.jpg

Screenshot_20190613-152840_SkySafari 6 Pro.jpg

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Posted (edited)

It's not to bad actually for us oldies, from next year, Mars is quite good and 2022 Mars and Jupiter placed higher in the sky. Gives us time to save up for that 16inch scope, lol. 

Edited by Nigella Bryant
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