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Dear all,

as suggested by Hughsie, here's my pastel sketch my contribution to the solar imaging challenge. 

20190529_Sun_H_alpha_small.JPG.80842f359271cf0324a99c0a06592d9b.JPG

Telescope: Lunt LS50THaB600PT
Eyepiece: Celestron X-Cel 10mm
Date & Time: May 29th, 2019 / 1630-1700 CEST
Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
Technique: reddish Koh-i-Noor Toison d'Or pastels and pastel pens on greyish Canson Mi-Teintes pastel paper

Like all of my astronomical sketches , I did this one directly at the eyepiece. The picture of the sketch is taken with my smartphone and just cropped.

Clear (and sunny) skies!

Achim


Size: 24 x 32 cm

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      Dear all,
      compared to four days ago, the solar disc and the prominences looked a bit more interestingly varied. I could do a sketch during the lunch break:

      Telescope: Lunt LS50THaB600PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
      Date & Time: May 19th, 2020 / 1300-1330 CEST
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
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      Hi all,
      as well today the sun is shining brightly here. I set up the Lunt to have a look at it, at first just for observing. However, somehow I cannot resist and have to do a sketch This time I've chosen reddish pastels on grey paper to better catch the color of the view in the eyepiece.

      Telescope: Lunt LS50THaB600PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
      Date & Time: May 15th, 2020 / 1400-1430 CEST
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: red and orange Koh-i-Noor pastels and pastel pens on grey Canson Mi-Teintes pastel paper
      Size: 24 x 32 cm
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