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Seanelly

Who has SW Evostar Black Diamond 100mm ED APO?

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Is/has anyone out there using/used this type of scope, be it the 80, 100 or 120mm aperture? I can't find anything in search. I'd like to see some SGL critiques and images, preferably but not necessarily with a DSLR. Online search brings up many 100ED images, but very few more definitive, and besides, the comments associated with the images (in Flickr, etc.) are almost exclusively plain dry facts. I bought the 100 in November of last year after many hours and days of reading reviews and general info on scope manufacturers, focal length, cost, etc., and I must say that so far I have zero regrets where quality, price, and performance are concerned.

I read more often than not that buying a shorter focal length scope was the best way for a beginner to get into imaging, as it was more forgiving, but I'm glad I went with my gut on the 900mm, mainly because I have a preference for globs and galaxies rather than nebulae, and from what I gathered I was fairly certain that with experience I could handle any problems a longer focal length scope might bring.

I bought the scope as a package deal which included the HEQ5 mount (another relatively quality piece for the price for this cash-starved newby) and Orion guidescope/guide camera, focal reducer-in short, everything I thought I needed (turns out not quite, but that's a whole nuther story) except my Canon T6i, which I picked up for a song (I won it in a karaoke contest, haha, just kidding, sorry if you've heard that one before) from an Ottawa University student who had used it for a semester. She said she took maybe only a few hundred photos before dropping the course, and the camera picture count was 1750/10,000 when I checked, considerably more than she said, but still nearly new, unless she lied and had rolled over the count, but the camera and screen were spotless, and even if so, 11,750 shutter releases was peanuts. My T2i has been used almost every day for five years taking hundreds of daytime photos and is still going strong, though I've worn out a couple of lenses. (My techie brother modded the T6i for $100 (I insisted he get something for his trouble) and it has performed flawlessly, and another welcome bit of savings.)

Anyway, plug for Canon out of the way, does anyone have anything to show or say concerning this scope, keeping in mind the relatively low price, etc.? I want the good with the bad, if it comes to that, as if there are any potential problems with it I'd like to have a heads-up.

Sean

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I've owned one 80ED, one 100ED and three 120ED's. Im purely a visual observer but can tell you with hand on heart the good and the bad about them. First the bad:  they are not Takahashi! Next the good, and the best compliment I can pay them:  they are very Takahashi like in visual performance. 

Essentially free of CA, they deliver razor sharp star images and high contrast, high definition views of both lunar and planetary,  as well as deep sky objects within their light grasp. 

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Well said. 

Love my ed 120.

Its a keeper. 

 

20190513_210748.jpg

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The key difference between them is that the Ed80 & Ed120 are F/7.5 , while the ed100 is F/9, which makes it a bit slow for AP.

So you'll find numerus photos with the ed80, as a great starter scope, and many with the ed120 (however less than the ed80 due to larger image scale and mounting requirements), but not as many with the ed100, which is oriented more towards visual.

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Ditto Mike's and Paul's comments.

There's an excellent write up on this range of refractors in Neil English's book on Choosing and Using Refractors.

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