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Hi,

since i started work on my observatory there hasn't been much time for AP, but since lunar photography is done in minutes i had a go yesterday.

Gear:

SW AZGTI with the Skymax127 and Sony A6300 and Baader Neodymium Moon & skyglow filter.

100 frames taken and 50% used to stack in autostackerd.

 

1795446588_Maan14-05-2019.thumb.jpg.e411934bfb4225e25b6b413ea5436cf7.jpg

 

Edited by Miguel1983
Typo
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Very nice image Miguel.

Where is your filter mounted? I ask as I have a 6300 and I can't mount a filter with my set up- my filters are 1.25"

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1 hour ago, Swoop1 said:

Very nice image Miguel.

Where is your filter mounted? I ask as I have a 6300 and I can't mount a filter with my set up- my filters are 1.25"

I have the filter mounted on the 2” nosepiece witch is mounted on the T-ring adaptor attached to the camera.

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1 hour ago, Miguel1983 said:

I have the filter mounted on the 2” nosepiece witch is mounted on the T-ring adaptor attached to the camera.

So, 2" filters?

I can't acieve focus with the 1.25" adapter on the noseiece.

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Lovely image, colours are nicely processed. :) 

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3 hours ago, Swoop1 said:

So, 2" filters?

I can't acieve focus with the 1.25" adapter on the noseiece.

Yes, 2”. 

I have no issues with focus, the nosepiece is mounted straight in the visual back of the Maksutov.

0E1CC3BB-057A-408B-9237-AFA8D2B238B0.thumb.jpeg.f944fd306d5f629f8062b2a3b625853c.jpeg

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6 hours ago, Miguel1983 said:

Yes, 2”. 

I have no issues with focus, the nosepiece is mounted straight in the visual back of the Maksutov.

0E1CC3BB-057A-408B-9237-AFA8D2B238B0.thumb.jpeg.f944fd306d5f629f8062b2a3b625853c.jpeg

Thanks Miguel. Looks like I will have to buy some 2" filters then.

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Swoop1, 

what about this

IMG_7387.thumb.JPG.6ae5196af8f0606163116c6be51584e1.JPG

This is how i do it, the difference with the 1,25" nosepiece is minimal.

IMG_7388.thumb.JPG.daa3ddb2d73102413506c41d0720be0d.JPG

Is it also a Mak you're using ?

 

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I use a Newtonian- currently a 150mm Skywatcher

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6 hours ago, Swoop1 said:

I use a Newtonian- currently a 150mm Skywatcher

So i guess you need more outward travel on your focuser ?

there are extension tubes available, but that would put your camera quite far above your telescope, making it more difficult to balance and you would have more vibration in your image train.

Is this the field of view you have ?

Doesn't seem to bad no ?

astronomy_tools_fov-2.png.88bc0ad7aca2444af73f463b87b46b1e.png

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7 minutes ago, Anthony1979 said:

I need more inward travel

There is an option to move the primary mirror further into the tube. You have to replace two sets of bolts (6 in total), and probably get three longer springs, but if you don't mind taking your primary mirror out (simply done with 3 screws), then it isn't difficult. 

I've done it to a SW 1145P small newtonian (that needed quite long , and to my SW150PDS when I fitted a baader cliklock (only an extra 10mm needed for that one).

Ady

- this advice is based on you having a newt. Rereading the thread, I may have got that bit wrong 😉 

Edited by adyj1
Nb

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Yeah mines a newt.... I dont really want to play around with the mirror because its fairly new

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17 hours ago, Miguel1983 said:

So i guess you need more outward travel on your focuser ?

there are extension tubes available, but that would put your camera quite far above your telescope, making it more difficult to balance and you would have more vibration in your image train.

Is this the field of view you have ?

Doesn't seem to bad no ?

astronomy_tools_fov-2.png.88bc0ad7aca2444af73f463b87b46b1e.png

Yes that is about my FOV with the Barlow.

When I originally started exploring imaging, I had a Sony a350 and bought a T ring with nose piece as a kit. I paniced when I couldn't get focus until I removed the nose piece and screwed the 1.25" adaptor directly to the T ring.

When using the Barlow, I do end up with a lot of focuser tube exposed.

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21 hours ago, Anthony1979 said:

I need more inward travel

then you also need a barlow, the barlow lens extends the focal point.

How-does-a-Barlow-lens-work.jpg.a411ed07ff312c2094f1f2335b495ab8.jpg

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