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ollypenrice

Mercury: how much interest is there?

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On 13/05/2019 at 15:00, michael.h.f.wilkinson said:

I have invested quite some time imaging Mercury on one or two occasions

 

WOW! I love these kind of images/videos so much. Really gives a great indication of the sizes and motions in question. Amazing video mate. 

Only very slightly off topic, i also absolutely love the images of he ISS and/or space shuttle transiting the sun as well. So cool.  How can anyone not find this interesting??

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I guess due to it's proximity and size, and sheer visual appeal, Mercury has less appeal and interest than most of the other solar system objects.

Still would be great to spot or image some surface detail from a backyard.

 

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Posted (edited)

I’ve seen it a few times with binoculars. I like to try because it’s quite satisfying to spot it. I did catch the last transit with my baby tak though, taped one of my binocular solar filters to the end of it. :) 

6067076A-4C4C-4B2C-8399-A6F653AC6C6F.thumb.jpeg.bd7e2ef571a6e8e8e86db460da132a61.jpeg

 

Edited by Scooot
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I've looked at Mercury last year when it and Venus both graced my late evening sun set. It seems I do better then than when Sol is rapidly rising in the East.

I'm also planning for the November transit, the weather Gods permitting.

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On 14/05/2019 at 23:09, MarsG76 said:

....

Still would be great to spot or image some surface detail from a backyard.

 

Is that even possible? I don't think i have ever seen an amateur image of Mercury with any detail...i'm curious and will do a search tomorrow.

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10 minutes ago, MKHACHFE said:

Is that even possible? I don't think i have ever seen an amateur image of Mercury with any detail...i'm curious and will do a search tomorrow.

 

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2 minutes ago, MarsG76 said:

Technically impressive, but if that's as much as can be seen, it just goes to show how small that little ball is. 

It's still something far being my capabilities. So, kudos to the photographer.  Thanks for the link MarsG76.

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33 minutes ago, MKHACHFE said:

Is that even possible? I don't think i have ever seen an amateur image of Mercury with any detail...i'm curious and will do a search tomorrow.

and check this out:

 

https://britastro.org/node/4931

 

Imaged using a 12.5" newt.

 

 

 

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20 hours ago, MKHACHFE said:

Technically impressive, but if that's as much as can be seen, it just goes to show how small that little ball is. 

It's still something far being my capabilities. So, kudos to the photographer.  Thanks for the link MarsG76.

Yeah it is a small rock ball, and always close to the sun... if you think about it this is quite impressive to get that much detail after shooting through the thickest part of the sky... its not as impressive as Jupiter or Saturn images but technically this much detail is an achievement with which, I for one, would be very happy.

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20 hours ago, MKHACHFE said:

Thanks again mate. 

Any time

 

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I've seen it only maybe a couple of times naked eye as it's so rarely an opportunity for me. I don't recall seeing it in a scope except for one transit which was great.

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I think its a real treat to catch it naked eye - it's so elusive.  Ive seen it in my scope near dawn a few times.

It is a fascinating place - especially having watched documentaries of the Messenger mission's discoveries.  For example the massive impact it received which is thought to have produced the weird surface featues on the opposite side of the planet.  And before that, the theorized impact that knocked the outer crust off the originally larger planet leaving the core, which is what we see as Mercury now.

As with many things, maybe not the best in the scope, but fascinating to see with your own eyes!  Really hoping to catch the transit in my Lunt 50mm. 

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