Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

Moon-Watcher

What scope is best for viewing/photography?

Recommended Posts

Ok.  Hello.  Just starting astronomy again. Would like to view/photograph moon/planets and maybe sun?

 

What would be best scope for this?  My 200p dobsonian or a skywatcher 120 refractor?

 

I also have a goto EQ5.

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're not new so ill skip the usual warning about the sun ? but if it was me I would only really consider imaging with the refractor. I know there are people who have some success with dobsonian imaging but much much easier on an EQ mount from my experience.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks.  The 120 will be on an eq3 2 mount but I have here a still unused eq5.

 

So in terms of picture clarity, what would be the main difference between the 120 and 200?

 

And yes, I will use a filter for viewing the sun ?

 

 Thanks again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say for planets and the Moon - dob. It will be very well for observing, and if it's driven for photography.

For Solar white light - best option is to go for refractor and Herschel wedge, but regular solar filter can be used as well (full aperture one like Baader solar filter).

In general you want aperture for high power observing and AP.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Following on from the above, if you use a refractor, a solar wedge is less likely to get severely damaged, (i.e. pinpricks, tears, etc., if using an approved solar safety film or the coatings wearing off, if is glass), over time ...unless you drop it. :crybaby2:

IMG_0675.thumb.JPG.d35db4742dbd9aa1808b501956a0ba0f.JPG

Above is my TeleVue Ranger with a Lunt 1.25" solar wedge ...the sky was overcast when I took this image. :clouds1:

Edited by Philip R
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 07/05/2019 at 12:44, Moon-Watcher said:

Ok.  Hello.  Just starting astronomy again. Would like to view/photograph moon/planets and maybe sun?

 

What would be best scope for this?  My 200p dobsonian or a skywatcher 120 refractor?

 

I also have a goto EQ5.

 

Thanks

The equipment mentioned will limit you to using a video (webcam or phone with adaptor) to record footage of the Moon, larger planets and the sun (using proper sun filters) and then stacking the frames in software.  The EQ5 will offer better results as with excellent polar alignment it will track the targets so you'll get sharper images.  So basically the 120 refractor on  the EQ5 (assuming the scope is within the weight limit of the mount) would be your best bet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Put your 200mm Newtonian on the EQ5 for imaging the Moon and planets and swap it out for a good small refractor for imaging DSO's.   😀

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Astrofriend
      Hi,
      I and my girlfriend are now drawing plans to catch the comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas on photo. It's just a few weeks until it reach it's maxima for us living in the Northern hemisphere. We belive there are a lot of others that plan to do the same. We use my travel mount Star Adventurer and two cameras with telephoto lenses, a bit overloaded but easy to bring to a dark place.
      I have updated my comet page with examples that belong to this comet. Maybe could be interesting or of some help for you ? UK isn't far away from Sweden and the circumstances not to different from ours in Sweden.
      http://www.astrofriend.eu/astronomy/tutorials/tutorial-comet-photography-planning/tutorial-comet-photography-planning.html
      I have also this comet related page that I wrote long time ago:
      http://www.astrofriend.eu/astronomy/tutorials/tutorial-find-comets/tutorial-find-comets.html
      We wish all of you a clear sky and that you get nice photos of the comet !
      Lars and Gunilla
    • By LordSaladMan
      I'll begin this post by saying, I've searched every forum.  I've tried every tip.  And I'm hoping you beautiful people can provide some suggestions based on my specific issue.  Because, as my title states, I'm just about ready to give up.  Here's a bit of background before I list the many ways I've tried to resolve the issue.
      I own a Celestron NextStar 8SE and a Canon Rebel T6.  After many nights of trying, I cannot get a clear image of planets, or even the moon.  I've given it plenty of time to reach thermal equilibrium each night (1-2 hours).  When viewing through the eyepiece, the image is an absolute blur.  When viewing from the camera, I get no image at all.
      Here are the things I've tried on the telescope itself:
      Focusing the telescope via the "Focus Knob" Collimating the mirror via the 3 screws Using a Duncan Mask to make collimation easier. Focusing the telescope on an object much closer, getting a clear, sharp image through the eyepiece and the DSLR, then attempting to view a star. Waiting for, and viewing during, a near-perfect clear night with very little atmospheric turbulence. I live on the westcoast of the US.  So, the only objects I'm able to see clearly (with the naked eye) are the moon and Venus.  I cannot describe the level of disappointment and frustration I feel when I can't clearly view them from the scope.  Venus is as bright as ever, and I'm getting a blur.  I tried using the DSLR and the planet doesn't show up at all.  Just black skies.  My DSLR settings are as follows:
      Manual Focus Shutter Speed: Bulb ISO: 1600 What am I missing?  I feel like I've tried everything and I just want to throw up my hands in defeat.
    • By BudgieMac
      If I am just generally looking through my telescope and find something interesting which is not near any identifiable object. Is there a simple way that I can save the position where my scope is pointing so that I can perhaps continue viewing the following night. Perhaps using a cell phone or other attachment, Some are so small that it is not visible through my finder scope.  I have the Skywatcher 8" on a Dobsonian mount. 
    • By Astronut_Al
      Hi everyone, 
      Can anyone confirm (or refute) - have I imaged Ganymede and Europa in orbit around Jupiter or is that just wishful thinking? (Only equipment used was a Lumix G7 with 150mm zoom lens - effectively 300mm with 2x crop factor - and of course a tripod).
      It appears to be the case and yet I can't quite allow myself to believe it...
      Thanks from an old newbie.



    • By Beckiii__
      I took these two photos only seconds apart. The top bit I took secondly. I’m not sure what it is I’ve captured. But can anyone tell me what it could be??

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.