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DJastrzebski

COMPLETED - Baader RCC I Rowe Coma Corrector

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Hey,

For sale is Baader Rowe Coma Corrector (RCC I) in a perfect condition (used max. 2 times). £90 including delivery in EU. PP preferred. Thanks for looking!

RCC-2.jpg

RCC-3.jpg

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Hi is the cc still for sale, please contact me on <private email address removed>

Regards

Neil

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