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Per_jensen

m81 & m82

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This one didnt quite go as planned, i think i might have tried to overcorrect for alot of things during post processing, but i might as well share it with you guys anyways. Then again, perhaps i've just stared too much at it during processing.. Anyways, i hope you like it :)

m81 & m82 LRGB
L 74 frames of 180s = 222 min
R 41 frames of 180s = 123 min
G 40 frames of 180s = 120 min
B 38 frames of 180s = 114 min

Total int. 9,6 hours

8" Reflecltor telescope
ZWO ASI 1600mm camera
Eq6-R Pro mount

L  74 frames of 180s = 222 min
R  41 frames of 180s = 123 min
G  40 frames of 180s = 120 min
B  38 frames of 180s = 114 min

Total int. 9,6 hours

final.png

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I am no expert regarding processing, but that looks superb to me Per. Some lovely fine detail visible in both galaxies.

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Awesome pic, Per, I can see Arp's Loop, good colors and detail. On my screen, the background looks a little red /magenta.

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Great shot.    Shows what the modest SW 200 Newt can achieve.   (   ....with a great deal of skill and perseverence added to the mix).

Well done.

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15 hours ago, Pete Presland said:

I am no expert regarding processing, but that looks superb to me Per. Some lovely fine detail visible in both galaxies.

Thank you so much Pete, i really appreciate your comment :)

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14 hours ago, AstroAndy said:

Awesome pic, Per, I can see Arp's Loop, good colors and detail. On my screen, the background looks a little red /magenta.

Thank you so much Andy, i wasnt aware of Arp's loop and mistook it for gradients of some sort lol. But now i've read up on it, i'm glad i got some of it! :) I didnt notice the red/magenta to be honest, i think i need to calibrate my monitor! :)

Thank you for your comment :)

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14 hours ago, Craney said:

Great shot.    Shows what the modest SW 200 Newt can achieve.   (   ....with a great deal of skill and perseverence added to the mix).

Well done.

Thank you Craney :) Yeah when you get to know the 200pds it's not so bad. But i really had some struggles with the primary mirror, the edges were horrible and gave off the worst kind of glare! Now i've masked the edges and it produces some find images :)

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6 hours ago, Per_jensen said:

i wasnt aware of Arp's loop and mistook it for gradients of some sort lol. But now i've read up on it, i'm glad i got some of it! :) I didnt notice the red/magenta to be honest, i think i need to calibrate my monitor! :)

No problem, while I'm not one to pixel peep with the quality of images I turn out ? , I zeroed in on the blue Holmberg galaxy, you even resolved some of the stars there, respect.

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On 28/04/2019 at 18:09, Per_jensen said:

This one didnt quite go as planned, i think i might have tried to overcorrect for alot of things during post processing, but i might as well share it with you guys anyways. Then again, perhaps i've just stared too much at it during processing.. Anyways, i hope you like it :)

m81 & m82 LRGB
L 74 frames of 180s = 222 min
R 41 frames of 180s = 123 min
G 40 frames of 180s = 120 min
B 38 frames of 180s = 114 min

Total int. 9,6 hours

8" Reflecltor telescope
ZWO ASI 1600mm camera
Eq6-R Pro mount

L  74 frames of 180s = 222 min
R  41 frames of 180s = 123 min
G  40 frames of 180s = 120 min
B  38 frames of 180s = 114 min

Total int. 9,6 hours

final.png

Very nice detail. Out of interest what coma corrector are you using?

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4 hours ago, Adam J said:

Very nice detail. Out of interest what coma corrector are you using?

Thank you Adam :)

I'm using an TS-Optics 2" 3-element MaxField Newtonian Coma Corrector. I bet you noticed the stars in the top right corner, am i right? ;) 

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7 hours ago, Per_jensen said:

Thank you Adam :)

I'm using an TS-Optics 2" 3-element MaxField Newtonian Coma Corrector. I bet you noticed the stars in the top right corner, am i right? ;) 

Actually no, I noticed the small ring around the brightest stars. I recognize it as I have the same corrector and it's been annoying me. 

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4 hours ago, Adam J said:

Actually no, I noticed the small ring around the brightest stars. I recognize it as I have the same corrector and it's been annoying me. 

I actually never thought about that untill you mentioned it Adam! Is it in all your subs as well? Cant check mine atm, but i will check later for sure 

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Cracking shot...

I too am getting a bit of a magenta tinge in the background but it's still a stunning capture and process.

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This a really beautiful capture, the detail is lovely, personally I wouldn't worry about the small amount of coma, this is really cool image.

I whipped this into PI to see what the magenta removal tool would do, I hit it a couple of times and attach the result, it's not removed all of it but has reduced it.

M81_M82.png

Edited by Jkulin
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4 hours ago, Per_jensen said:

I actually never thought about that untill you mentioned it Adam! Is it in all your subs as well? Cant check mine atm, but i will check later for sure 

I think it's a little dim to appear clearly in individual subs but it's always in integrations. 

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Great image Per, and if I were to dabble in the 'dark art' I should be very happy with this. A fabulous pair of Galaxies ! :thumbsup:

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Great image and great detail. Something for me to aspire to, thanks for sharing.

James

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