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Anvil Basher

BRESSER Full HD Deep-Sky camera & Guider

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Hi. I am looking at buying a camera for the scope. Anyone own the one in the title? If so, does it indeed do deep space photography? I have seen conflicting reports on it regarding deep space viewing. I am in a dark area regarding viewing and nearby light sources. I own the eq5, goto, 8inch skywatcher. Would I also need a reducer to film the moon and get the complete moon in?

Thanks

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12 minutes ago, Anvil Basher said:

Hi. I am looking at buying a camera for the scope. Anyone own the one in the title? If so, does it indeed do deep space photography? I have seen conflicting reports on it regarding deep space viewing. I am in a dark area regarding viewing and nearby light sources. I own the eq5, goto, 8inch skywatcher. Would I also need a reducer to film the moon and get the complete moon in?

Thanks

Do you have a link to the camera ?

The best way to take an image of the moon is to take a series of overlapping images and create a mosaic in Microsoft ICE. If you try to squeeze the full disc down to fit onto the sensor, which I don't think will work, you will end up with a low resolution image with little detail.

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And to give you an idea of why you wouldn't be able to fit the whole of the moon on the sensor, the reducer need to get the focal length of the telescope down to about 300mm.

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15 minutes ago, Cornelius Varley said:

And to give you an idea of why you wouldn't be able to fit the whole of the moon on the sensor, the reducer need to get the focal length of the telescope down to about 300mm.

Yes, I have the svbony 105 camera. It needs the reducer also. I get the complete moon with a 25mm eyepiece. What size reducer would I need. My scope is 1000mm

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38 minutes ago, Anvil Basher said:

Yes, I have the svbony 105 camera. It needs the reducer also. I get the complete moon with a 25mm eyepiece. What size reducer would I need. My scope is 1000mm

Probably a 0.33x reducer. Creating a multi pane mosaic will give you betters results.

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7 minutes ago, Cornelius Varley said:

Probably a 0.33x reducer. Creating a multi pane mosaic will give you betters results.

Thanks. Multi pane Mosaic????I have heard of this before, but it sounds very technical........lol. I am just familiarising myself with the software and would not have a clue as to where to start in creating multi pane mosaic. I was wanting video footage rather than a still.

Edited by Anvil Basher
added on I want video footage

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Here is a Cartes Du Ciel screen capture showing the field of view for the Bresser camera at 1000mm and 330mm.  The inner rectangle is 1000mm.

If you haven't already got Cartes Du Ciel, then I would highly recommend it.  One of its features is a field of view calculator which I used to make this image.  It is incredibly accurate.

 

 

cdcmoon.jpg

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Nice image Don. Do you own this camera? How do you find deep sky observation with it? I have yet to get involved with software for these cameras as I need to decide which camera to go with. I have an mcp in vb6 so the software side should be fathomable for me.

Is it becoming common to have chips rectangular in shape?

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10 hours ago, Anvil Basher said:

Is it becoming common to have chips rectangular in shape?

Most imaging formats are 4x3 or 3x2, very few are 1x1.

Michael

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16 hours ago, Anvil Basher said:

Nice image Don. Do you own this camera? How do you find deep sky observation with it? I have yet to get involved with software for these cameras as I need to decide which camera to go with. I have an mcp in vb6 so the software side should be fathomable for me.

Is it becoming common to have chips rectangular in shape?

I don't have this camera.  The image above is very easy to produce in CdC.  You just fill in a couple of boxes with the camera's details.

 

There is an online Field of view calculator here :- https://astronomy.tools/calculators/field_of_view/

This is very useful for evaluating new equipment.  It gives you a good feel for the effects of focal length and camera chip size.

The shape of this chip is a bit unusual.  The ratio is about 2:1.  As said above,  4:3  or 3:2 are fairly "normal".

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7 hours ago, don4l said:

I don't have this camera.  The image above is very easy to produce in CdC.  You just fill in a couple of boxes with the camera's details.

 

There is an online Field of view calculator here :- https://astronomy.tools/calculators/field_of_view/

This is very useful for evaluating new equipment.  It gives you a good feel for the effects of focal length and camera chip size.

The shape of this chip is a bit unusual.  The ratio is about 2:1.  As said above,  4:3  or 3:2 are fairly "normal".

I know many astrophotographers use dslr cameras, so would a novice in this field, (me), be better off with dslr or cmos? I just don't want to end up buying something that I later regret. For instance, can I get a focul reducer for a dslr? are they expensive? Are the filters expensive, or are there adaptor rings so that I can use the ones I have already? The cmos are all 1.25 with threads ready for filters, so not a problem. I, like many 1000's, have a limited budget, but at the same time would rather not buy something that suits my budget but not my requirements.

Thanks for the above info though ?

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2 hours ago, Anvil Basher said:

I know many astrophotographers use dslr cameras, so would a novice in this field, (me), be better off with dslr or cmos? I just don't want to end up buying something that I later regret. For instance, can I get a focul reducer for a dslr? are they expensive? Are the filters expensive, or are there adaptor rings so that I can use the ones I have already? The cmos are all 1.25 with threads ready for filters, so not a problem. I, like many 1000's, have a limited budget, but at the same time would rather not buy something that suits my budget but not my requirements.

Thanks for the above info though ?

The question about DSLR cameras is a contentious one. 

On the screenshot that I posted the small rectangle is the field that you would get with the sensor in the Bresser at 1000mm.  The larger rectangle is the view that you would get at 330mm (ie with a .33 focal reducer).  However, the larger rectangle would also be the field at 1000mm if the sensor was 3 times bigger.  So, if you use a DSLR, you won't need a focal reducer to cover the same field of view.  You might need a field flattener though!

I don't know if this makes much sense.  I do remember that when I started, I didn't understand  any of this at all.  Anyway, generally speaking, a bigger sensor is better - especially for DSO.  DSLR's give the biggest bang for buck in this area.  So, if you already have a DSLR, then it is probably best to start with it.  You don't need any filters to start with, and if your light pollution isn't too bad, then you can get fantastic results.

 

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22 minutes ago, don4l said:

The question about DSLR cameras is a contentious one. 

On the screenshot that I posted the small rectangle is the field that you would get with the sensor in the Bresser at 1000mm.  The larger rectangle is the view that you would get at 330mm (ie with a .33 focal reducer).  However, the larger rectangle would also be the field at 1000mm if the sensor was 3 times bigger.  So, if you use a DSLR, you won't need a focal reducer to cover the same field of view.  You might need a field flattener though!

I don't know if this makes much sense.  I do remember that when I started, I didn't understand  any of this at all.  Anyway, generally speaking, a bigger sensor is better - especially for DSO.  DSLR's give the biggest bang for buck in this area.  So, if you already have a DSLR, then it is probably best to start with it.  You don't need any filters to start with, and if your light pollution isn't too bad, then you can get fantastic results.

 

Light pollution here is virtually non-existent. So the dslr's have bigger sensors? Do you know much about the canon t6i? sort of in my price range.

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1 hour ago, Anvil Basher said:

Light pollution here is virtually non-existent. So the dslr's have bigger sensors? Do you know much about the canon t6i? sort of in my price range.

I've just noticed that you want to get video footage, rather than images.  I don't know much about the video side of things.  My comments about the size of the sensor will be correct,  but apart from that I don't really know anything.

 

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1 minute ago, don4l said:

I've just noticed that you want to get video footage, rather than images.  I don't know much about the video side of things.  My comments about the size of the sensor will be correct,  but apart from that I don't really know anything.

 

Both really. You have been of great assistance. The more I learn the wiser I become. I shall keep picking brains until I choose my choice. Cheers ?

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So after more research into this model, it seems it is only suitable for fitting in the eyepiece. I wanted to use it as a planetary video (moon), and a guider as I intend to get myself a dslr camera also. 

Apparently it has no available connectors to use it either with my spotting scope, or in place of it. So that buggers that up ?

My attention has now been drawn to this Altair gpcam2 290C Colour Camera/Guider. I have contacted the seller to see if I can use this as my spotter or with it.

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Thinking further.........do these types of cameras require focusing? Just wondering as I see them stand-alone on the top of scopes, and attached to spotter scopes, and in the eyepiece. The eyepiece has focus, so do some spotters?, but stand-alone..no.

Anyone able to let me know?

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3 hours ago, Anvil Basher said:

Thinking further.........do these types of cameras require focusing? Just wondering as I see them stand-alone on the top of scopes, and attached to spotter scopes, and in the eyepiece. The eyepiece has focus, so do some spotters?, but stand-alone..no.

Anyone able to let me know?

To use these cameras, you replace the eyepiece with the camera, and then focus as normal.

As far as I can see, the Beresser attaches to the scope in the same way as the svbony.

Think of the Camera as an SLR, and the telescope as the lens.

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7 minutes ago, don4l said:

To use these cameras, you replace the eyepiece with the camera, and then focus as normal.

As far as I can see, the Beresser attaches to the scope in the same way as the svbony.

Think of the Camera as an SLR, and the telescope as the lens.

I want it as a guider. It can still take video through the spotting position. I want my dslr in the eyepiece for pics dso. Apparently, I need to change my spotting scope to one that accepts 1.25 lenses, etc. So I have purchased one.

Thanks.

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