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65/420 and 70/478. Which one you would use DSO imaging?


65/420 and 70/478. Which one you would use DSO imaging?  

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  1. 1. You're out with two APO refractors 65/420 and 70/478. Which one you would use DSO imaging and which of them left for visual observing?

    • 65/420 for DSO imaging, 70/478 for everything else.
      0
    • 70/478 for DSO imaging, 65/420 for everything else.
      1


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It would depend on the size of the target.  I don't quite understand your figures and what they represent, but use whichever one fits the best FOV for the target in mind and use the other for visual.  I have several scopes and am changing them around depending on the target.

Carole 

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