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Startinez

Do you remember the first time you saw Jupiter?

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Well for me that was this morning. What an experience.

 

I woke up at 4 because of the glorious forecast only to find clouds still outside, so I went back to sleep for another 45 minutes. I almost didn't get up the second time as I've been ill lately and not sleeping so well - but I'm so glad I did. It was just visible over the neighbours' various trees but looked divine through a 7.5mm lens via my 90mm refractor. Clear cloud bands and all 4 Galilean moons spread around it was such a beautiful thing to witness for the first time.

 

I didn't hang around for more than a few minutes because of the aforementioned illness but I'm super excited to get a longer view where I can see how the moons move in relation to it.

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yes i was 6 years old "49 years ago" with a 60mm cooke frac which i still have in the loft but saturn was what i remember most it had ears. charl.

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I saw Jupiter and the 4 big moons through some binoculars 5 years ago. All I could see was a very bright blob and 4 fainter points all in a straight line. The view was terrible knowing what I know now but at the time I thought it was amazing and it got me into observing.

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Yes I remember and I think it was the fact you could see the moons so clearly that made me awestruck. A sight I will never forget and still love it when I look now.

? 

Steve

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Unforgettable, I worked out its position from a popolurar sky almanac ( mostly astrological) and got up at 4am to see it through my new 4" reflector from the kitchen window. I was 13 yrs old and it blew my mind.

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Posted (edited)

It would have been around '76 or '77 through my Dixon's own brand 60mm tascoesque refractor.

Jupiter was in Gemini so quite high up. It had moons and dark belts across the disk!

 

Edited by Paul M

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Yes, and well done BTW!

My first time was just three days after getting my first 'scope.  Just thrilling to see a planet - such a close object.  The Galilean moons were really impressive, and so easy to see.  They were in a line, two each side.

I didn't see any bands until a few days later, then more popped up later again.  It took me 2.25 years however to see the Great Red Spot.  Perhaps you might manage that in less time!

Also, after many viewings, it is fascinating to notice how the moons move - not always in a straightish line, sometimes in front of Jupiter (casting a shadow), sometimes behind, sometimes "above".

It's a target you never tire of!

Doug.

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My first observation of Jupiter was way back in the mid 1970's. I borrowed a friends 60mm refractor for a few months and spent each clear night observing Jupiter and sketching it's moon positions and surface detail. To start with I was just getting the two main cloud belts but after a few weeks my observing skills had improved so I was getting some of the more subtle and finer cloud belts as well. Never did see the Great Red Spot during that period though, at least not knowingly.

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I can't be 100% sure about Jupiter, but I certainly remember Saturn. That knocked my socks off, but I prefer Jupiter. It's more dynamic. Saturn really only had one redeeming feature..  the rings.

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My first time seeing Jupiter was, without doubt, the moment that I got hooked on astronomy. It was a couple of months after I got my first telescope. I just spotted this bright “star” as I was walking back into the house just before going to bed. I used my phone to figure out what it was. I thought about it then decided to get my telescope about. The thing that amazed me was seeing the moons. I hadn’t expected to see them, such was my lack of knowledge at that stage. I didn’t see any detail on the planet that night but I was over an hour later going to bed after tear. An unforgettable night. Here are the pictures I took that night.

182C9394-340C-4B0F-A477-1F70C2573E19.thumb.jpeg.54c3f00fd5c330637afe566c9f553fdd.jpeg84165F34-3A60-4D3D-A028-436D8F14DE52.thumb.jpeg.a99bf2ed27af40ffaea9dff06cb6a9e9.jpeg 

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My first view of Jupiter was in 1998 with my 4.25" f8 Celestron Newton and 10mm Orion superplossl Sirius  (still have them in Italy).

I was 15 at the time and was hooked. I used to set my alarm at 2am every day to observe it for about 2h and then go back to sleep until 7am to get ready for school. Lovely nights, so quiet and beautiful. I could see the two main belts, and some minor detail, plus the four moons. 

One of the best experiences I've ever had. 

 

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I cannot remember the first time I saw Jupiter, but one view that I remember was one evening/night several years ago. I was viewing Jupiter and the Galilean moons were eclipsed by the planet itself. I stayed at the eyepiece to watch them to reappear one by one. 

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My first view of Jupiter through a 12mm eyepiece was awesome, but I could barely make out its banding. However, my second using merely a cheap Celestron NexImage Burst camera blew my socks off.....

Jupiter.JPG.ab56ba33f0f834d2e47b29442ffd25ab.JPG

This is a low resolution stacked image produced under horribly light polluted urban Bortle 6 skies. It is what lured me into the deep money pit that is EEVA and AP.  Beware! 

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My first was sometime in the late 60's

 I thought the 3" or maybe 4" reflector was the most incredible thing to allow me to see something I never imagined seeing.

But what stuck in my mind the most was Saturn! 

All these years later, I still get a rush of excitement seeing these wonderous thing most will only see in someone else's photos.

Enjoy your time gazing into the heavens.

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I saw Jupiter for the first time ever this morning under magnification. I wasn’t expecting what I saw after observing Mars (due to its distance), but wow totally blown away. 

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Must have been around 1976 for me, saw it for the first time with a friends new telescope through an open bedroom window after school one night, had to do some research the following day as we had no idea what we were looking at.

I've seen it countless times with much better telescopes since but can still see it as it was that first time in my minds eye.

 

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I go back to the mid 50's. I had ordered a 50mm variable power Naval gunsight from Headquarter and General Supplies. It was made of brass and weighed a "ton", the case it came in was even heavier. It only zoomed from 5x to 9x so I sent it back. Before doing so I had a squint at Jupiter and could make out the moons. The rest is history!     ? 

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It was back in the 60s for me as a young teen with a combination of a Charles Frank 6 in reflector and some Swift eyepieces, got the full house regarding views with the GRS included.

Alan

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I can't actually remember the first time, but I guess it was around 20 years ago when I got my first scope, a 6" Celestron Reflector.

At that time Jupiter was at nearly 60 degrees altitude, and under 10 degrees from Saturn and in my naivety I guess I thought they were always like that! Even in my dodgy Bird-Jones Newtonian, it looked excellent but I didn't really know what I was looking at at the time so I doubt I made the most of it. I wish I had the experience and kit I have now back then!

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Through my 60mm Jupiter was a couple dark lines separated by off white almost yellow gaps and very small in the frame, this was 1974...

Ironically I own a modern pair of nautical 10x50 binoculars with ruby coated lenses that I kept in the dash of my cabin boat not intending to use them for astronomy but when on the water at night I often did...They showed more detail and with better clarity on Jupiter than that first telescope, both were about $300 US and were purchased 36 years apart.

This is just comparing one small dot to another though and a lot of water has gone under the bridge ?

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Earlier this year for me,  February I think.  I wasn't expecting to see all four moons so that was an extra bonus.  I still haven't seen Saturn yet due to neighbour's trees but I have calculated using Star Walk app that by this time next month it should be clearly in sight,  can't wait! 

Deb 

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