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Mark1489

Antares/Rho ophiuchi

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Hi all, Not sure if I’ve posted this in the right place!

Is it possible to image Rho Ophiuchi from the UK? If it is, what time of year is best, I’m guessing the summer? I’ve used stellarium to try and figure out when would be best but I’m pretty new to locating things in the sky! Any help would be appreciated! 

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Hi Mark and welcome to SGL.

As long as you have a clear southern horizon it possible to image the Rho Ophiuchi region from the UK at least from down south.

It's always low and suffers from imaging though low atmosphere but if you do a search in the imaging section you should find some examples.

Dave

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Hi Dave, thanks for the welcome!

Luckily if I travel 20 minutes I have a clear southern horizon with no light domes, so I shall give it a try! Looks like people have had some success! 

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Posted (edited)

It is in view now after midnight, until about June.  I have tried to get it from the UK with mixed results.  it's pretty huge, so you need a wide FOV.  

I managed to get it in Spain with a DSLR on a Skytracker a couple of years ago.  Am planning to add to it this year from Spain with a mono camera on the skytracker to get a bit more nebulosity.

When I tried it from East Sussex, the results were pretty horrible with the DSLR, and I managed to get a small area of Luminance once from South Kent.

I'd be interested to see what you manage to get.  

Carole 

Edited by carastro

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Hi Carole

Sounds good, I hope it turns out well for you! ? I’m currently using a 135mm lens with a crop sensor, I’m hoping I’ll be able to capture the majority with this! 

Mark 

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Hi Mark

I wish you well with this, as it's one of the most amazing objects to image in the night sky (imho) and i would love to shoot it myself. I too have a 135mm lens and a crop sensor DSLR.

However, and i don't mean to be a wet blanket here, but i think this is going to be a tough one. I don't know what your latitude is in Wales, but here in N.I i am at 54 degrees N. Which means R.O never gets above 8 degrees altitude. To make things worse, it's a late Spring target, when dark skies are at a minimum (in fact there is no astro dark then, just astronomical twilight). I've done a bit of research into this, and the only time that's even feasible for us here in N.I is the beginning of June. At that time, there will be no moon, and there is just about 2 hrs of Astronomical Twilight around the time when the object transits. So if you have a very clear view of the Southern horizon, and the weather plays ball, then this is your best time to try and catch this. FWIW i'm not even sure i can see 8 degrees altitude to the South, the neighbour's house is probably in the way ☹️

Here is a great website for checking how much darkness there is on any day of the year. The link is for Belfast, so you'll just need to alter it to your nearest location.

https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/uk/belfast

Good luck. Hope you get it! 

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Hi Xiga 

Thanks! It’s definetely my favourite deep sky view, so much colour! 

I thought that might be the case! I’m at 51 degrees N on the south coast of Wales so slightly better but not by much. That must be frustrating for you though, maybe you need to take a trip somewhere abroad one day to get a proper chance to image it ? That’s my long term plan If I can’t get anything half decent! Like you said, you need the weather too and that’s definitely not guaranteed ? I also like the look of the blue horsehead slightly above it, that may be a bit easier! Thanks for the link, a very useful site!! Hope you get a chance of imaging it too.

Mark 

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Antares and Rho Ophiuchi

In Australian Indigenous Dream-time, there is a  story about how Antares was formed

Men's Business

A man stole another man's wife

The man and women hid in a tree

The man who was betrayed found them hiding in the tree, and set fire to the tree

The Rainbow Serpent came down and picked up the man and women and formed Antares

Indigenous men, know every time they see Antares, they not to steal another man's wife

 

This morning when leaving home around 4-30am,  both Scorpio and Crux were overhead

Red star Antares also know as the heart of Scorpio

Saturn was also adjacent to Antares, with Venus and quarter moon just above the eastern horizon

Have not looked for Rho Ophiuchi

John

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hi there...I managed to get a rudimentary shot of this amazing target when on holiday last year in Mauritius (southern hemisphere) where Antares is high in the sky with all the planets!

But in your case, a tool you can use is the Telescopius site (formerly dso-browser). Once you've clicked on a target, you can choose to see its transit for the current night or "monthly" at a certain time like 10pm - the latter shows the altitude of the target throughout the year - I think Rho peaked very low (15 degrees) around July to August in the Northern hemisphere.

I hope this helps!

Edit: I just checked the site - I searched for IC 4604 and at 11pm it peaks on June 28th at 15 degrees altitude looking from my location of Surrey. Good luck with it!

Edited by eshy76

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Posted (edited)

If it helps, Mark, I have imaged Antares and the Rho Ophiuchi region from just under 50.4 deg. N. here in Cornwall. The location was a beach, with the view South entirely over the sea. It was around 1:30 am in mid June.

I used a Vixen Polarie star tracker, 100mm lens and modded EOS 600D DSLR. It's not the sharpest image I'm afraid, as I had used the lens with the aperture wide open rather than stopping down a little.

I hope to get a better image from Tenerife later this year, but this is what I have from home: 

Antares and the Rho Ophuchi region

Regards, Mike.

Edited by mcrowle
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Much higher up the further south you go but if you can see the dark horse of the milky way  then it's pretty near that and Antares 

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5 hours ago, eshy76 said:

Hi there...I managed to get a rudimentary shot of this amazing target when on holiday last year in Mauritius (southern hemisphere) where Antares is high in the sky with all the planets!

But in your case, a tool you can use is the Telescopius site (formerly dso-browser). Once you've clicked on a target, you can choose to see its transit for the current night or "monthly" at a certain time like 10pm - the latter shows the altitude of the target throughout the year - I think Rho peaked very low (15 degrees) around July to August in the Northern hemisphere.

I hope this helps!

Edit: I just checked the site - I searched for IC 4604 and at 11pm it peaks on June 28th at 15 degrees altitude looking from my location of Surrey. Good luck with it!

Hi! That's great! I am slightly jealous of your holiday to Mauritius, must have been good to see some different things in the sky. That site is definitely a big help, looks like its fingers crossed for some clear weather towards the end of June! 

 

 

3 hours ago, mcrowle said:

If it helps, Mark, I have imaged Antares and the Rho Ophiuchi region from just under 50.4 deg. N. here in Cornwall. The location was a beach, with the view South entirely over the sea. It was around 1:30 am in mid June.

I used a Vixen Polarie star tracker, 100mm lens and modded EOS 600D DSLR. It's not the sharpest image I'm afraid, as I had used the lens with the aperture wide open rather than stopping down a little.

I hope to get a better image from Tenerife later this year, but this is what I have from home: 

Antares and the Rho Ophuchi region

Regards, Mike.

Hi Mike,

Great photo, glad to know it's possible to get images of it even though the timeframe is limited!  I'm using a Samyang 135mm and Nikon d5300 on a SW star adventurer, its unmodded, but I'm hoping that won't make too much of a difference. Good luck with your imaging in tenerife, looking forward to seeing what you get ?

Mark

 

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Posted (edited)

are there any bits of the region that suit a longer focal length (1000mm, just under 1 arc-degree) ?  I've got a week in Spain next week and hopefully the weather allows. 

Edited by glowingturnip

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Well I got lucky with the weather last night and took a trip down to Rhossili on the Gower peninsula, with a nice dark southern horizon. Unfortunately my tracking was awful, not sure if this was due to the wind or the fact that it was so low in the sky, but I managed to stack the best frames I could. Probably threw about 70 % of them! I think guiding would have helped a lot, something which I’m going to start doing. Anyway here it is 16 frames x 60 sec ISO 1600, manually dithered, very pleased! 

 

4A41AA04-0835-49A5-89EB-CFC703B800CA.jpeg

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Excellent result Mark, well worth the trip.

Dave

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The problem is that there are lots of faint blues which are soon lost to the atmosphere at low elevations where we are shooting through so much of it. Even here at Lat 44N it isn't a target I recommend to guests. However, Mark really has done well from the Gower (location of Penrice Castle, might I say! Not that it's mine...)

?lly

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6 minutes ago, ollypenrice said:

The problem is that there are lots of faint blues which are soon lost to the atmosphere at low elevations where we are shooting through so much of it. Even here at Lat 44N it isn't a target I recommend to guests. However, Mark really has done well from the Gower (location of Penrice Castle, might I say! Not that it's mine...)

?lly

Thanks Olly! I have to be honest when I saw with my own eyes how low it actually was and frame after frame of egg shaped stars I was starting to think I’d wasted my time ? Apart from looking through more atmosphere, Is it harder to track objects lower in the sky? My periodic error seemed like it was through the roof 

Mark 

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2 hours ago, Mark1489 said:

Thanks Olly! I have to be honest when I saw with my own eyes how low it actually was and frame after frame of egg shaped stars I was starting to think I’d wasted my time ? Apart from looking through more atmosphere, Is it harder to track objects lower in the sky? My periodic error seemed like it was through the roof 

Mark 

You can take a long exposure of Polaris on a fixed tripod...

Olly

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Wow Mark - I just saw this - fantastic shot! Congratulations!

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On 31/03/2019 at 21:14, Mark1489 said:

Hi Carole

Sounds good, I hope it turns out well for you! ? I’m currently using a 135mm lens with a crop sensor, I’m hoping I’ll be able to capture the majority with this! 

Mark 

Greetings Mark,

You have chosen quite a colourful object to photograph.

The approx size of Rho Oph region is about  4.5 x 6.5 degrees.

Now with your 135mm lens and a APS-C sensor of 14.8mm x 22.2mm (Canon cmos sensor) you will get a field of view of 6.3 x 9.4 degrees.

An excellent match.

Jeremy

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Mark's great pic has inspired me to post mine. Shame I only had a stock DSLR but lucky I had the Lacerta MGen to rescue my haphazard Southern Hemisphere polar alignment!

1715101580_IC4604_3(ResampledResized)-800x532.png.2daa8c8e5797f26299e49082c43fd25f.png

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Thank you for the kind comments! I will be adding more data to this in future so I can clean up some of the noise and hopefully get some more of the red Ha showing!

On 12/05/2019 at 12:27, JRWASTRO said:

Greetings Mark,

You have chosen quite a colourful object to photograph.

The approx size of Rho Oph region is about  4.5 x 6.5 degrees.

Now with your 135mm lens and a APS-C sensor of 14.8mm x 22.2mm (Canon cmos sensor) you will get a field of view of 6.3 x 9.4 degrees.

An excellent match.

Jeremy

The colours are definitely what make it my favourite object! I'm using a Nikon D5300 but the field of view is about 6x10 degrees so very similar!

2 hours ago, eshy76 said:

Mark's great pic has inspired me to post mine. Shame I only had a stock DSLR but lucky I had the Lacerta MGen to rescue my haphazard Southern Hemisphere polar alignment!

1715101580_IC4604_3(ResampledResized)-800x532.png.2daa8c8e5797f26299e49082c43fd25f.png

Great picture! Your's has a lot less noise than mine, how much integration time do you have if you don't mind me asking? I'm using a stock dslr too, I find I can capture some Ha but it just takes A LOT of total integration time 😀

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Posted (edited)

Hi Mark - I got 2.4 hours of integration time over three nights, 89x75s at ISO400 at 135mm and 6x300s at ISO800 at 430mm. APP put it all together easily - I think the lack of noise is due to 1. Antares being overhead in Mauritius away from light pollution 2. Using dithering 3. Using quality weighted subs when stacking in APP 4. Processing technique - I used TGV Denoise and MMT in PI, with bright masks.

Hope that helps. Here is a link to the higher res version: https://www.astrobin.com/356347/C/?nc=user

Edited by eshy76
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On 06/05/2019 at 01:01, ollypenrice said:

You can take a long exposure of Polaris on a fixed tripod...

Good point, well made! 😀

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