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Ive never used a camera before so was just wondering what starter camera to begin with that doesn't cost hundreds of pounds thanks

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Depends on exactly what you want to achieve. Will you want to plug it into a telescope (I am assuming this below) or simply use it with a standard camera lens for widefield shots?

A common starter camera (DSLR) for deep sky AP is one of the canon range. They often come up second hand, so should not break the bank. If you can get one that is "modded" (one of the internal filters is removed) it will produce much better results for AP, but would be effectively useless for terrestrial imaging. If you are thinking lunar/planetary, then one of the modified webcams is the usual route. Finally, if you are wanting to get into DSO imaging in a big way, you can't beat a cooled CCD/CMOS camera, but you will then be in the "hundreds of pounds" bracket.

In general, the mount you will be using is more important than the specific camera, as this is what will limit the length of exposure you can take.

That is just some general principles. More details of what you want to achieve (and you LP situation) will enable more tailored advice.

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Yeah i want to attach it to my scope.... Im looking to take pictures of moon and some stars to start 

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+1 for DemonPerformer response.. I use a modded Canon 40D and this camera is great for AP. Big pixels, great light sensitivity and good noise levels.. and the best part is that they're very cheap on eBay these days.

 

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Another daft question... Can i use any camera or does it have to a specific one thanks 

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You need a camera where you can take the lens off as your telescope will become the lens, like say a canon 1100d keeping it cheap or say 550d as would suit planets moon and general getting to know a dslr or don't go camera but something like a ZWO120MC as a starter/cheapest or you already own a webcam you could modify.

Not all telescopes are suitable what do you have and what is your budget?

Best to read and understand more before spending any money.

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19 hours ago, Anthony1979 said:

Ive never used a camera before so was just wondering what starter camera to begin with that doesn't cost hundreds of pounds thanks

I think you need to give more information.

What exactly is your budget?

What do you want to take Images of?

What mount do you have?

What scope do you have?

Thanks.

Adam J

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My scope is a jessops 70 x 900 refractor nothing special on a EQ-2 mount and budget between 50-100 pounds nothing to expensive thanks 

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With a static mount you can image the Moon. You could capture this holding a camera phone up to the eyepiece.

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Assuming you either have a laptop or long usb lead you might look for either (both second hand) Philips SPC900NC or a ZWO ASI120MC. They come up for sale on here. This would let you image planets and the Moon.

A used DSLR is over budget as you would also need adaptors.

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If you did look for a DSLR I would not got older than a Canon 450d. 

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Generally planets and the Moon are taken using video frames which are then processed into the best ones to make a image using something like registax which is free and good. What you use to take the video is down to what you might already own, borrow or buy.

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Your mount is static and your refractor is quite long and the Earth is rotating so any camera exposure lengths need to be short like 1 second or less this means getting enough light to the camera to show deep space objects unlikely. You could try Orion or say clusters like m44 but you would need to take several hundred to see something once all the images were stacked.

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4 hours ago, Anthony1979 said:

So is the moon my limit with this set up

The Moon's the best target for a scope like this. On the planets something like this Saturn might be achievable.

post-29157-0-00948100-1361217005_thumb.jpg

Which was taken using a non-motorized mount by taking video with a webcam, as Saturn drifted across the field of view. The individual frames were then stacked in Registax (probably the best 10% or so) and the stacked image was sharped using wavelets. 

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Do you already own a laptop and if so what operating system is on it?

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Just one thing.

I'm not altogether sure that this telescope and mount could handle the weight of 'any' DSLR hanging off the back.

My smallest is a 400D but it is still quite a lump.

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No I'm not saying that at this time (in the future you will most likely if you get hooked).

It's just that check that your telescope rig can handle having almost 1 1/2 pounds or 556g hanging off the back.

I do have an appropriate webcam type video camera that I'll dig out and post a picture of.

It weighs next to nothing and was most likely the one that Knight of Clear Skies used for Saturn in the above image.

Best, Rich

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If your telescope can move forward or backward on the mount ring then you can adjust the balance for when you might use a camera.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Anthony1979 said:

So i would need to upgrade my telescope 

I would say you are limited to the moon with that setup.

For DSO imaging you would need a new mount, it the most important bit to spend money on in any imaging setup, EQ5 pro minimum really or EQM-35 or HEQ5 or a for something more compact a star-adventurer.

The second thing would be a new scope of appropriate focal lenght and weight for your chose mount and a f-ratio more appropriate for imaging.

Adam

Edited by Adam J
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