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markclaire50

Most beautiful double/multistar system, through a scope?

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What I'm looking for are opinions on THE most beautiful double or multistar system. 

That moment when you find yourself saying something out loud! 

Thanks 

Mark 

Edited by markclaire50

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Well, it's a bit like asking which is one of the most iconic rock tracks ever, and looking surprised when most people say "Stairway to Heaven"??..

..So here goes with my top 3.

1. The Trapezium in Orion. An easy quadruple in almost any scope, and a sextuple in a 4" upwards under good conditions. The astounding backdrop of the M42 nebula only adds to the wonderful spectacle. I will never tire of observing this lovely object.

https://goo.gl/images/J1Dddq

2. Albireo in Cygnus. Just jaw dropping colour contrast (blueish and gold to my eyes) with sparkling starfields adding  "diamonds on velvet" contrast. Separation about 35" and can be split in many binoculars (a tripod or monopod helps). Here is a link to a nice image...

https://goo.gl/images/h7mLW7

3. Mizar in Ursa Major (the Plough). A wonderful system of white stars, with Mizar being seen as an easy double at c14" separation, (a true binary system) and it's naked eye line-of-sight companion, Alcor, some distance away. And for added interest, a faint 8th magnitude star is visible between Mizar and Alcor, slightly offset from the centre of the gap between the two. It was named Sidus Ludovicanum in the 1700s after an obscure historical prince. Here's how it looks in a scope..(orientation depends on whether you use a Newtonian, a Maksutov or a refractor..)

https://goo.gl/images/Mh78Rp

Dave☺

 

Edited by F15Rules
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Hmmm, tricky one. Not sure I can only give one.

Sigma Orionis has to be one of my favourites. Not hard to split, but the fourth component is faint, and it is always lovely to see these four with the triangle above it making seven.

The Double Double is a classic, and under good conditions with a nice refractor it looks spectacular.

Izar is a regular favourite of mine. Tightish double with a greyish blue secondary, doable in a small scope, and lovely in a larger one too.

Loads up there, Beta Mon is another cracker.

 

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4 minutes ago, F15Rules said:

Well, it's a bit like asking which is one of the most iconic rock tracks ever, and looking surprised when most people say "Stairway to Heaven"??..

..So here goes with my top 3.

1. The Trapezium in Orion. An easy quadruple in almost any scope, and a sextuple in a 4" upwards under good conditions. The astounding backdrop of the M42 nebula only adds to the wonderful spectacle. I will never tire of observing this lovely object.

2. Albireo in Cygnus. Just jaw dropping colour contrast (blueish and gold to my eyes) with sparkling starfields adding  "diamonds on velvet" contrast. Separation about 35" and can be split in many binoculars (a tripod or monopod helps).

3. Mizar in Ursa Major (the Plough). A wonderful system of white stars, with Mizar being seen as an easy double at c14" separation, (a true binary system) and it's naked eye line-of-sight companion, Alcor, some distance away. And for added interest, a faint 8th magnitude star is visible between Mizar and Alcor, slightly offset from the centre of the gap between the two. It was named Sidus Ludovicanum in the 1700s after an obscure historical prince. Here's how it looks in a scope..(orientation depends on whether you use a Newtonian, a Maksutov or a refractor..)

https://goo.gl/images/Mh78Rp

Dave☺

 

Thanks. Did you know that mizar is alledgedly the first telescopic binary to be discovered? I'm now waiting with baited breath for someone to say that is a myth? ? 

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2 minutes ago, Stu said:

Hmmm, tricky one. Not sure I can only give one.

Sigma Orionis has to be one of my favourites. Not hard to split, but the fourth component is faint, and it is always lovely to see these four with the triangle above it making seven.

The Double Double is a classic, and under good conditions with a nice refractor it looks spectacular.

Izar is a regular favourite of mine. Tightish double with a greyish blue secondary, doable in a small scope, and lovely in a larger one too.

Loads up there, Beta Mon is another cracker.

 

Thanks Stu. Yes, I am at the beginning of my adventure with doubles. I love beta Mons because it surprised me first time I looked at it. Thought my optics were playing up, until I increased the mag, and behold, it split! I thought the double was the wide pair I saw. Imagine my surprise at a triple. ?

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7 minutes ago, markclaire50 said:

Thanks. Did you know that mizar is alledgedly the first telescopic binary to be discovered? I'm now waiting with baited breath for someone to say that is a myth? ? 

May well be true, not sure. It was the first object I viewed in a scope having read about it in a Patrick Moore book. I understand that each star including Alcor is also a spectroscopic binary, so they are a naked eye double, telescopic double and spectroscopic double with six stars in total. That's what I've read anyway!

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5 minutes ago, markclaire50 said:

Thanks. Did you know that mizar is alledgedly the first telescopic binary to be discovered? I'm now waiting with baited breath for someone to say that is a myth? ? 

I could quite believe that but will let someone else confirm or otherwise ☺

Dave

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1 minute ago, Stu said:

May well be true, not sure. It was the first object I viewed in a scope having read about them in a Patrick Moore book. In understand that each star including Alcor is also a spectroscopic binary, so they are a naked eye double, telescopic double and spectroscopic double with six stars in total. That's what I've read anyway!

So have I. Actually it was a Patrick Moore booked called The Comet, that I got from a library aged about 10 or 11, that triggered my Astronomy interest. 

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I like 56 Andromedae, no, it's not a well known double but it's great for binoculars and sits right on the edge on NGC752 which is a great low power cluster...

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5 minutes ago, markclaire50 said:

So have I. Actually it was a Patrick Moore booked called The Comet, that I got from a library aged about 10 or 11, that triggered my Astronomy interest. 

Actually just checked its publication date on amazon and it was 1978. So I must have been 13. Memories become blurred. I could swear I was in primary school! And it was called Comets, not The Comet.. ? 

Edited by markclaire50

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As per the first two responses, the Trapezium is awesome and just keeps on giving with its fainter components to discover and Alberio is just like a painter’s palette of colours. Mizar and Sigma Orionis are also very attractive to behold. The double double is wonderful, but only gives the instant wow in a big scope imo. 

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Just now, RobertI said:

The double double is wonderful, but only gives the instant wow in a big scope imo. 

Have you seen it through a good 4" apo Robert? Pretty stunning in my view, perfect stars and nice big splits between the doubles.

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Alas not visible to you folks "up north", but I  well remember saying "oh wow" out loud when I  first looked at The Jewell Box (NGC 4755), in the Southern Cross. So aptly named, it is a small open cluster that just scintillates with sparkling colours.

The Pearl Cluster nearby in Carina is of similar size and brightness but mostly gleaming white stars.

I also recently saw the wonderful double 145 Canis Majoris the Winter Albireo for the first time, another "oh wow" moment. Orange/yellow main star and ice blue companion, lovely.

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The Summer Albireo is pretty splendid too!

Another vote for Sigma Orionis here.

If you use SkySafari, there is a Coloured Doubles observing list that you can upload from their website.

Paul

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1 hour ago, Stu said:

Have you seen it through a good 4" apo Robert? Pretty stunning in my view, perfect stars and nice big splits between the doubles.

No, and I would really love to! I guess I was  basing the comment on struggles with my motley array of scopes! ? I think also I was remembering my struggles trying to view it with my smaller 72mm, and forgotten what it was like in the larger scopes. I would really love a 4” or 5” apo for the reasons mentioned, hoping I can get some views through some nice examples when I pop to Kelling in April. ?

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- Albireo was the first double star that I ever observed, way back with my 60mm Tasco refractor. Still got a soft spot for that one.

- Porrima (Gamma Virginis) is another early observation so nostalgic to view today with much better equipment.

- Beta Monocerotis is truly wonderful and really lives up to William Herschel's description "one of the most beautiful sights in the heavens"

- Iota Cassiopeia is a delicate triple that I often visit.

- My winter pilgramage to Canis Major to try and separate the Dog Star from the Pup has become a habit now as well.

Favourite rock track ??? - "Highway Star" by Deep Purple. How apt ! :icon_biggrin:

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All the above are lovely, I'd like to add iota Cancri. Mag 4 yellow primary with a mag 6 blue secondary 31" seconds away. Very attractive and an easy split for anyone to enjoy.

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9 minutes ago, Astro Imp said:

All the above are lovely, I'd like to add iota Cancri. Mag 4 yellow primary with a mag 6 blue secondary 31" seconds away. Very attractive and an easy split for anyone to enjoy.

I'm patiently waiting for this one to emerge from behind the trees, which it should do in the coming weeks. I've been wanting to see it for a long time, it sounds beautiful, probably similar to 145 Canis Majoris I imagine.

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2 hours ago, RobertI said:

As per the first two responses, the Trapezium is awesome and just keeps on giving with its fainter components to discover and Alberio is just like a painter’s palette of colours. Mizar and Sigma Orionis are also very attractive to behold. The double double is wonderful, but only gives the instant wow in a big scope imo. 

How big? ?

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1 hour ago, Paul73 said:

The Summer Albireo is pretty splendid too!

Another vote for Sigma Orionis here.

If you use SkySafari, there is a Coloured Doubles observing list that you can upload from their website.

Paul

Hi. Is that sky safari app for android? 

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4 minutes ago, markclaire50 said:

Hi. Is that sky safari app for android? 

Available for both iOS and Android

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