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Hello from The Netherlands


edkedk
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Hello all,

I am new here and my name is Erik. Sinds approx. 2 years ago, i started with my hobby looking above in space with a telescope.  Back then, it was with a small 60mm japanese refractor telescope (60/700). Watching the moon with it.  Since one year ago I bought a second hand Skywatcher Skyliner 8 inch dobsonian, as a point-and-shoot telescope to watch the moon and some planets, and just started watchings some DSO with it (Orion nebula, and Andromeda galaxy), just the easiest to find.

I was so thrilled by seeing them through the eyepieces that I am making a step further, into astrophotography since a two months.  I bought a Skywatcher EQ5 mount, with one RA axis motordrive. 

And I also own a Bresser messier 80/900 refractor. Both telescopes on the list for mounting on the EQ5 to start doing astro photograpy of DSO objects witj my DSLR.  In the first place, I want to learn  a lot with my hobby, by reading on forum and doing and exploring the sky with the instruments i own now.

For the time being I use a Canon EOS 600D for imaging on the dovetailmount with a Tamron 70-300mm telelens.    No funds yet to buy an expensive 80mm APO refractor.... 

I have read a lot about stacking software and know a little how to use them.

Since last year I have visited a local observatory a few times, that was very interesting and inspiring.

Hope to learn a lot from all of you, and hopefully I can improve my quality of DSO photos someday with the materials I have now...      I suffer a lot from star trailing with RA drive, guess the cause is in bad Polar alignment, right ?

 

Cheers and clear skies,

Erik from Zutphen (The Netherlands)

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Welcome to SGL from a bit further north in the Netherlands. I would suggest starting off with (shortish) telephoto lenses for DSO imaging. I started out with my 135 and 200mm lenses, and use a short refractor for most DSO stuff (480mm focal length (also 80mm aperture), usually reduced to 384mm with a focal reducer). It is much easier to get decent tracking results due to the lower magnification.

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Erik

Welcome from Land Down Under

Have a 10" collapsible dob, and a SW ED80 also on an EQ5 mount

Getting back to your Dob

The hard plastic cover, has a small detachable cap

If you sticky tape baader solar film, underside of hard plastic cover, under the detachable cap, you are able to do solar viewing

John

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6 hours ago, Andy R said:

Hello Erik and welgome

What is the light pollution like where you live?

Enjoy the site!

 

Hi Andy, The Neterlands is actually pretty light polluted. But times are changing and from now on light pollution is decreasings since a year ago. But still, when i look at darksitefinder map, everywhere is just middle-poluted (orange colour at best). So I think i need a light polution filter to get better DSO images from faint objects.  But these filters are expensive, around 180 Euros.

 

@all:  thanks for all kind replies !

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Hello from Dordrecht,

Do you have good places for observation there?

In my backyard is Bortle 8,because of light pollution ,but outside the city can be Bortle 5,closer to the sea can have B4.

How is in your place?

maybe you have some star parties there?

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Hi Erik, welcome from Apeldoorn. 

On 01/03/2019 at 15:53, edkedk said:

Since one year ago I bought a second hand Skywatcher Skyliner 8 inch dobsonian,

That a nice dob for DSO observing.

Clear skies.

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