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markclaire50

Do you have one eye better than the other?

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I've noticed a preference for using my right eye when looking through my scopes . I always seem to think I can see slightly more. Both eyes are sharp in daylight with glasses. 

Anyone else prefer one eye over the other? 

Edited by markclaire50
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I'm a lefty. Left handed too.

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Left one - seriously sharp :D ... Right one is borderline usable even in daylight - astigmatism and farsightedness.

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I'm a 'leftie' ...'lefty' too! :thumbsup:

Edited by Philip R
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I'm right handed so I aim firearms with my right eye. I've just always defaulted to my right eye when looking through a telescope too, even though my left eye actually has better vision.

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I find refocussing for each eye is needed and also suggest this for others as well each observer should focus for him or herself when a telescope is shared.

It also helps to refocus often when using a reflector type telescope that has not yet fully acclimated or is being used in quickly rising or falling temperatures and of course lower magnification will be more pleasing during these times...

There are a lot of advantages to using both eyes for observing from binoviewers to using an eyepatch to view bright planets within seconds of observing faint dso, in fact there are so many advantages and applications that I've discovered and learned through the years that I may scribe a post one day covering dark adaptation, averted vision and the benefits of useing both eyes for visual astronomy. 

Though my preferred eye for observations is my right and it is also the better eye when examined by an optometrist the only difference between the two eyes when using a telescope is the view in my right eye appears closer or more magnified, but both eyes are just as sharp when individually focused through a telescope even though without the scope my left eye is quite blurred without my prescription glasses. I notice this immediately upon switching eyes and forgetting to refocus every time and of course the fix for this is just to wear my glasses but then eyepiece eye relief and using an eyepatch become more cumbersome as a result.

 

         Best of Luck Everyone ?

                            Freddie...

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by SIDO
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Left eyed and left handed here also. Right eye is okay, just seems natural to use my left. I would like to try binoviewers though I must say.

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I've tried to use my left, and I could if I gave it a chance, after practising, but my right won't allow it.

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Righty. My eyes have been changing of late with my distance vision not so good anymore, particularly in my left eye, but not bad enough for glasses yet, so just looking up at the night sky is not as pleasurable as it once was. As for observing I have tried the left but it just doesn’t seem ‘right’ If you know what I mean, I think this partly due to it being more difficult to close my right eye for any period beacause I never need to.

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5 hours ago, markclaire50 said:

I'm right handed. I wonder if there is a correlation? 

Not necessarily. I'm right handed, left eye dominant.

Even in daytime on the rare occasion I do clay pigeon shooting or archery I use my left eye. But, at night time my left gives me better views; my right eye seems to give brighter low light images but with poorer resolution, and a little like a badly tuned TV is noisier. The left gives slightly more muted views but with much better clarity and resolution. Given that I love planetary and solar high power viewing I favour my left eye.

However..... I do have an annoying floater in my left eye, quite centrally placed, so over the past few years I have trained myself to enjoy binoviewing which reduces the impact of these at small exit pupils. It took me quite a while to retrain my brain due to the differences between my eyes, but now enjoy them for lunar, planetary and solar observing. I tend to prefer single widefield eyepieces for deep sky observing. With a larger scope which produces larger exit pupils I am also happy viewing with my left eye.

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Im right eyed and right handed. Although I see well with either eye, I tend to be able to detect more subtle detail on lunar, planetary and deep sky using my right. Yet my left eye gives a slightly brighter view! Also, each eye has a slightly different colour biase, with my right eye having a blue biase and my left having a pink/orange biase. Wierd!

1572904296_2019-02-2807_24_54.png.8a83ad884901192dca9c6ce37520b737.png

 

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I'm right handed but left eye dominant. I mostly observe with my left eye but maybe 1/3 of the time switch to my right. My left eye has more astigmatism than my right and more short sightedness, but  my right eye has worse floaters. My right eye often  does better on colour perception.

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11 minutes ago, mikeDnight said:

Im right eyed and right handed. Although I see well with either eye, I tend to be able to detect more subtle detail on lunar, planetary and deep sky using my right. Yet my left eye gives a slightly brighter view! Also, each eye has a slightly different colour biase, with my right eye having a blue biase and my left having a pink/orange biase. Wierd!

1572904296_2019-02-2807_24_54.png.8a83ad884901192dca9c6ce37520b737.png

 

Interestingly I've always felt my eyes are similar to mikednights ; better detail with right. ; slighter brighter with left??. I never feel mentally comfortable with using the left. Certainly I couldn't pick out the E star at all last night. Although that could be simply down to spending less time trying with it. I have wondered about binoviewers. 

Last night, I'm amazed I saw anything, what with my synscan app playing up with alignment and goto, cats fighting in next garden, security lights coming on next door, kitchen light being turned on behind me, added to my own incompetence of initially trying to align stars with a 150x mag eyepiece! 

But I kept pushing on! ???

Edited by markclaire50
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Right handed and use my right eye for observing. It just seems more comfortable, I have tried my left eye and it seems really awkward.

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16 minutes ago, markclaire50 said:

Interestingly I've always felt my eyes are similar ; better detail with right. ; slighter brighter with left??. I never feel mentally comfortable with using the left. Certainly I couldn't pick out the E star at all last night. Although that could be simply down to spending less time trying with it. I have wondered about binoviewers. 

Last night, I'm amazed I saw anything, what with my synscan app playing up, cats fighting in next garden, security lights coming on next door, kitchen light being turned on behind me, added to my own incompetence of initially trying to align stars with a 150x mag eyepiece! 

But I kept pushing on! ???

You need a shed Mark! (Sorry, I meant Observatory)!! All he'll can be breaking loose outside those walls but inside you're shielded from most of it. Every lad needs a shed! (Observatory)!!

20190220_171127.thumb.jpg.94434ce6cb5706e26a67efde2fac97ef.jpg

Edited by mikeDnight

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There seems to be a disproportionally high number of lefties in our midst, given that right handedness is still the norm.

I wonder if it has anything to do with many of us lefties being of an age group in our 50's and 60's who were the first generation that weren't forced to use our right hands at school, as was the norm before WW2, or so my mother told me.

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4 hours ago, markclaire50 said:

 I have wondered about binoviewers.

Well, once you've got the inter ocular separation set and rotated the diopters accurately to merge the image, they are a joy to observe with. Youll find that your eyes focus at slightly different points, so you may need to retract one eyepiece slightly. It soon becomes second nature!

The night before last, I was looking at Castor using my 100mm frac, 2.25X barlow and binoviewer with two 12.5mm Ultima eyepieces. The magnification was around 266X. The view was textbook perfect, with Castor showing a brilliant white primary and a light pink secondary. If I'd looked at nothing else all night I'd have been completely satisfied. The perfect Airy disc's looked just like two tiny Sun's, which had me wondering what it would be like to view the scene from a planet orbiting one of them? Using both eyes is very relaxing for me, and binoviewers and binary stars seem to be made for one another. Who cares about looking at fuzzy objects? Stars are amazing, and they are so often overlooked!

I did of course look at other things too. The six stars in the Trapezium were an obvious target,  as was the bright and dark nebulosity of M42. But the stars were what were on my mind, and as I aimlessly sweep the constellations using my GP equatorial, numerous jewels drifted into the field of view. One that stood out to me was a tiny uneven double, the primary of which was as red as blood itself. Simply gorgeous! 

Edited by mikeDnight
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2 hours ago, mikeDnight said:

Stars are amazing, and they are so often overlooked!

So true, and one of the reasons I would love an Apo with decent aperture, it would open up a world of doubles and clusters. I have never actually looked through a larger (100mm +) Apo, so am hoping to bag a view through one when I spend a few hours at Kelling Heath in April. 

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5 hours ago, Geoff Barnes said:

There seems to be a disproportionally high number of lefties in our midst, given that right handedness is still the norm.

I wonder if it has anything to do with many of us lefties being of an age group in our 50's and 60's who were the first generation that weren't forced to use our right hands at school, as was the norm before WW2, or so my mother told me.

I had a friend in Polytech (showing my age) who was forced to write with his right hand in school. He was born in 1964/1965.

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3 hours ago, mikeDnight said:

Well, once you've got the inter ocular separation set and rotated the diopters accurately to merge the image, they are a joy to observe with. Youll find that your eyes focus at slightly different points, so you may need to retract one eyepiece slightly. It soon becomes second nature!

The night before last, I was looking at Castor using my 100mm frac, 2.25X barlow and binoviewer with two 12.5mm Ultima eyepieces. The magnification was around 266X. The view was textbook perfect, with Castor showing a brilliant white primary and a light pink secondary. If I'd looked at nothing else all night I'd have been completely satisfied. The perfect Airy disc's looked just like two tiny Sun's, which had me wondering what it would be like to view the scene from a planet orbiting one of them? Using both eyes is very relaxing for me, and binoviewers and binary stars seem to be made for one another. Who cares about looking at fuzzy objects? Stars are amazing, and they are so often overlooked!

I did of course look at other things too. The six stars in the Trapezium were an obvious target,  as was the bright and dark nebulosity of M42. But the stars were what were on my mind, and as I aimlessly sweep the constellations using my GP equatorial, numerous jewels drifted into the field of view. One that stood out to me was a tiny uneven double, the primary of which was as red as blood itself. Simply gorgeous! 

I have some questions. Did you see both E and F? Did you identify the double with the blood red component? 

I don't find single stars as interesting as doubles, which I am very interested in, as there are so many permutations of angular separation and colour combinations possible. Challenge and beauty combined! 

Can you hit your theoretical rayleigh limit with doubles? 

Finally, please remind me what make your frac is? 

Thanks 

Mark 

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Getting back to eyes.

I have noticed that during a sight test, I can spy the letters further down the chart when using both eyes together. This is despite the opticians best efforts to provide me with 'best' correct in each eye. Apparently this is an expected response. So why don't we use binocular visual aids more often?

 

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1 hour ago, markclaire50 said:

I have some questions. Did you see both E and F? Did you identify the double with the blood red component? 

I don't find single stars as interesting as doubles, which I am very interested in, as there are so many permutations of angular separation and colour combinations possible. Challenge and beauty combined! 

Can you hit your theoretical rayleigh limit with doubles? 

Finally, please remind me what make your frac is? 

Thanks 

Mark 

Hi Mark,

Yes I did see both the E & F stars. I see them regularly but last night was particularly steady, so they were a little easier than usual. Sadly I didn't attempt identifying the tiny blood red star. My observing session was more of a mystery tour last night, as I just wanted to view the sights. If I remember rightly, I was near or within Cassiopeia. It's secondary companion tried tricking me into thinking it was grey/blue, but studying it for some time I came to the conclusion it too was a red star only less bright, and it was the intensity of the blood red primary that overpowered the colour of the fainter secondary.

I'm not sure what the Rayleigh limit is supposed to be for a 100mm scope, and I rarely pay much attention to theoretical limits. I read years ago that a 4" scope can split 1.1 arc seconds, but back in the early 2000's, Sky & Telescope ran an article showing the separation of Sigma 1126 close to Procyon as being 0.9"arc. I along with my friend Derek both made a definite split using a Vixen 102mm F6.5 ED apo, which was way beyond the scopes ability according to theory.

I can imagine everyone on this forum shouting "Oh, don't get him started about his #¥₩₩☆$ telescope"!!  :icon_puke_r:

It's a Takahashi FC100DC. Which is a 100mm F7.4 Steinheil fluorite apo doublet. The FC100D fluorites are quite popular on SGL.

1090387059_2019-02-2514_35_31.thumb.jpg.902f7ded420dc2d229cbee4897fc9239.jpg

 

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I'm right eyed and handed. I have astigmatism in my left eye. I like to use binoculars but really dislike using my specs. I can just get away with it some of the time and it was easier with the Pentax 20x60s with its smaller exit pupil but its frustrating. I also perceive colour differently in each eye with my right seeing  things very slightly more blue. I tend to think of my right eye as the better more dominant but which eye shows "normal" colour I don't know.

Edited by Alfian
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1 hour ago, Alfian said:

I'm right eyed and handed. I have astigmatism in my left eye. I like to use binoculars but really dislike using my specs. I can just get away with it some of the time and it was easier with the Pentax 20x60s with its smaller exit pupil but its frustrating. I also perceive colour differently in each eye with my right seeing  things very slightly more blue. I tend to think of my right eye as the better more dominant but which eye shows "normal" colour I don't know.

Hi

I need glasses but always prefer taking them off to look through my scope. 

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