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petermcc

Advice on my new scope:)

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Hey everyone, 

I was hoping for some advice on my new scope and its capabilities. I really want to view the planets, nebula etc.

I have a Celestron 130EQ MD Newtonian Reflector - Aperture 130m (5.11") Focal Length 650mm (25.6") I have a 2x barlow and 9mm, 10mm, 15mm, and 20mm lens. 

Any recommendations or advice would be amazing. 

 

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27 minutes ago, petermcc said:

Any recommendations or advice would be amazing.

Hi.

Have you learned to master it in daylight when all the controls and accessories are easy to see, and any target in the landscape is good for practice?

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Hi Peter

Congrats on the new scope!

Well, there's lots to learn...and see ? .  First thing is about setting up the mount so it will follow the path of the stars across the sky.  The manual will help you set it up so that the 'RA' axis points toward north celestial pole (pole star / polaris), assuming you are in the northern hemisphere?.  Using it for visual you don't need to be too precise, it will just help with the manual tracking.  As for capabilities, it will be good for the moon, and the larger planets (Jupiter and Saturn mainly), and you should look for some of the brighter night objects, Messier 42 in the sword of Orion is great.  A word of caution - you wont see all the vibrant colours and details you see in magazines and online, (these images are built up with light captured over many hours normally).  Double stars, globular clusters, and some Asterisms like the 'coathanger' 'beehive' and 'double cluster' will be good to see. the 9mm and 10mm are only for use on the moon or maybe planets, deep space objects need more light, and are usually bigger so the 15 and 20mm will be your best ones to use normally.  The barlow (doubles the magnification of any of the eyepieces used with it) will only really make things dimmer and more fuzzy unfortunately, so only use that on the moon for now

good luck with it

Mike

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Hi @petermcc and welcome to SGL. :hello2:

The planets are not well placed or only visible early morning at present. There are plenty of other exciting things to view, if you know where to look. M42, (Orion Nebula) and M45, (Pleiades) in Taurus are quite easy targets to begin with. 

I have a hunch the 2x Barlow maybe too much for the 9mm & 10mm e/p's. 

Edited by Philip R

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6 minutes ago, Philip R said:

Hi @petermcc and welcome to SGL. :hello2:

The planets are not well placed or only visible early morning at present. but there are plenty of other exciting things to view, if you know where to look. M42, (Orion Nebula) an M45, (Pleiades) in Taurus are quite easy targets to begin with. 

I have a hunch the 2x Barlow maybe too much for the 9mm & 10mm e/p's. 

Thanks for the advice @Philip R really appreciate it and thanks for the warm welcome ?

Viewing the Orion nebula/ Pleiades, any recommendations on which of my lenses to use and if I should use the Barlow? I was planning on buying some more lenses as well, any advice on sizes for best viewing etc. 

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13 minutes ago, mikeyj1 said:

Hi Peter

Congrats on the new scope!

Well, there's lots to learn...and see ? .  First thing is about setting up the mount so it will follow the path of the stars across the sky.  The manual will help you set it up so that the 'RA' axis points toward north celestial pole (pole star / polaris), assuming you are in the northern hemisphere?.  Using it for visual you don't need to be too precise, it will just help with the manual tracking.  As for capabilities, it will be good for the moon, and the larger planets (Jupiter and Saturn mainly), and you should look for some of the brighter night objects, Messier 42 in the sword of Orion is great.  A word of caution - you wont see all the vibrant colours and details you see in magazines and online, (these images are built up with light captured over many hours normally).  Double stars, globular clusters, and some Asterisms like the 'coathanger' 'beehive' and 'double cluster' will be good to see. the 9mm and 10mm are only for use on the moon or maybe planets, deep space objects need more light, and are usually bigger so the 15 and 20mm will be your best ones to use normally.  The barlow (doubles the magnification of any of the eyepieces used with it) will only really make things dimmer and more fuzzy unfortunately, so only use that on the moon for now

good luck with it

Mike

Thanks @mikeyj1 really good tips there, really appreciate it :) I thought using the 9mm with the 2x Barlow was going to be my best chance at viewing planets, nebula etc. I have a lot to learn it would seem lol

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3 minutes ago, petermcc said:

Thanks for the advice @Philip R really appreciate it and thanks for the warm welcome ?

Viewing the Orion nebula/ Pleiades, any recommendations on which of my lenses to use and if I should use the Barlow? I was planning on buying some more lenses as well, any advice on sizes for best viewing etc. 

My best advice at this stage is... don't use the Barlow until you feel comfortable... and another thing... don't buy a set of e/p's because you think you are getting a bargain. It is false economy IMHO.  

Edited by Philip R

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42 minutes ago, Philip R said:

My best advice at this stage is... don't use the Barlow until you feel comfortable... and another thing... don't buy a set of e/p's because you think you are getting a bargain. It is false economy IMHO.  

Thanks for the advice again. I shall leave the Barlow to one side for now and just play with the lenses :) Do you think ill get a good view of the Orion Nebula with my 9mm lens or is it best to use the 15mm? 
Not really sure what lenses I should buy. I was looking at getting a 4mm as well.

 

Thanks again for all the help. Being at the start of my astronomy journey is daunting haha 
 

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Welcome. Have lots of fun with your scope. ?

As suggested above don’t be seduced by high magnification ... ?

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Peter

Welcome from Land Down Under

Another thing going to need for your scope, is an reliable 12V power source

I use a car jump start pack, and have used for an entire week at astrofestivals 

John

jump start pack.jpg

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Always start with the e/p with the biggest number/lower power, and increase to lower number/higher power. A useful addition for viewing some diffuse objects would be a Neodymium filter. They can be a bit pricey, but It would be an improvement visually then magnification. There are other filters for different purposes, but generally the Neodymium is my 'Swiss Army Knife' of filters.

TBH - I think the 4mm is going to be overkill.

Edited by Philip R

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