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Leo Triplet (M65, M66, and NGC 3628), The Leo Triplet is a small group of galaxies about 35 million light-years away in the constellation Leo.

large version at astrobin

https://www.astrobin.com/391520/


Date: 4th January and 2nd February 2019
Mount: Skywatcher EQ6-R Pro
Telescope: Orion 10" f/3.9 Newtonian Astrograph
Camera: Nikon D5300 self modded full spectrum
Total exposure: ~3 hours
Subs : 300sx36, Flats, Bias, Darks
ISO: 400
Guide Scope: Orion 50mm
Guide Cam: ASI120MM
Filter: Optolong UV/IR cut
Corrector: Baader MPCC Mark III Coma Corrector
Capturing: digiCamControl
Guiding: PHD2
Stacking: Deep Sky Stacker
Processing: Pixinsight/Photoshop
Location: Ridiyagama, Sri Lanka


thank you and clear skies.

leo-1300-1.jpg

Edited by tasheeya
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Lovely image with good focus, flat background and nice round stars.  Very well accomplished indeed ?.

For my own personal preferences, I find the colours in the galaxies a little too cool, with some of the soft yellows of the cores missing. HTH.

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