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DS24

Which telescope better for what?

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So I recently started getting into this a couple months ago and got my first telescope then (MAK 127MM 1900MM) and I've used it for looking at the moon and taking pictures of the moon A lot of times already and I think it's fantastic because it will make the whole Moon fill up the entire View and just a few days ago I received another telescope (102AR Doublet) in the mail because I wanted something with a wider field-of-view that would be good for other types of objects like nebulas and galaxies or whatever that is too large for my Mak to see all of. And I have only been able to use it once so far and everything looks very good through it but the only thing I don't really like is that when I take a picture with my DSLR attached it produces some blue rings around the Stars and for whatever reason it only comes out in the pictures and I don't see any of that through the eyepieces.   but I'm wondering if I should get a reflector specifically this one in the picture. I'm wondering if it would allow me to see things significantly different or things I wouldn't be able to see with the two telescopes I already have.  

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The 8" Newtonian is a great all round scope capable of giving great visual views and great images. Alternatively, if you like the versatility and ease of use of your refractor with its wide fields, you might consider selling your 102AR and your 127 Maksutov, and buy a 102mm ED apo refractor. Such a scope will give you both wide field and high power lunar & planetary views, along with some very contrasty deep sky views. An ED refractor will also produce pin point star images without the blue colour fringing produced by your achromat.  

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So somebody mentioned that an 8 in reflector would be good for a dark sky but I am in a neighborhood in the city with lots of Lights house lights street lights lights on businesses so would 8 inch reflector not be ideal for my location? Because I mainly just go out in the yard to look up in my telescopes so I'm wondering for my area would the 8 in reflector not produce as good of image since it would be gathering in maybe all that light as well?

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Refractors 101...

The refractor was the very first telescope ever developed; before any other...

https://www.tiki-toki.com/timeline/entry/722273/INVENTIONS-IN-THE-17th-AND-18th-CENTURY/

But, they exhibited oobs and gobs of false-colour around the brighter objects.  Then, in the early-to-mid 1700s, the achromatic refractor was developed...

Dollond achromatic refractor

That one is very much like the ones that Captain Cook carried during his travels; note the length of the tube, and compared to your ES AR102.  Finally, minimal false-colour was seen when viewing brighter objects, and with a manageable tube-length, unlike the early refractors of the 17th century.  Back then, the tube had to be much longer, like this one from the mid-1600s...

hevelius

...so as not to see the rampant false-colour so much. 

The short achromats, like your own, are a very recent development, comparatively, and to compete with other designs of short-tubed telescopes on the market.  Folks nowadays like short, compact telescopes, and in favouring ergonomics over optical performance as a result.  I have an 80mm f/6 achromat...

964128361_Comet46P-Wirtenan-121618b.jpg.7ac0b87139c79786ff0c7c591cd54e32.jpg

...but I don't take it seriously, not like I do this 90mm f/10...

100818.jpg.d4afa555ce2c22c2fd99e304391ebfe8.jpg

If I want especially low-power views, I'll use my eyes or a pair of binoculars, for telescopes in the first place are for seeing faraway objects up close.

With this 102mm f/8 fluorite-doublet, the only times I've seen false-colour was when the front lens was covered with debris, and when throwing the focus in and out when viewing a bright star...

FS-102v3b.jpg.315a58f2446e765d730bde829b1f2c1b.jpg

This is a great buy on a 102mm f/7 ED refractor, but there's a wait period...

https://www.astronomics.com/astro-tech-at102ed-4-f-7-ed-refractor-ota.html

Edited by Alan64

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Well I know all that but I still don't know which is better between a reflector and refractor  especially for a light polluted area like most neighborhoods

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It has been said by many that the best solution for that is a tank of petrol, and then to get as far away from the big-city lights as possible.  However, that's not a practical solution for many.

An 8" Newtonian, or "Dobsonian",(which?), would collect more light from the objects being observed, and with increased resolution(detail).  But a larger aperture would also "collect" more artificial light, sky-glow, at the same time.  To reduce the effects of light-pollution, it's not the type of telescope so much, nor the aperture, but rather the things to combat it.  A light-shield over the the front of the telescope, and at least a foot in length for an 8" telescope...

https://stargazerslounge.com/uploads/monthly_04_2012/post-30602-133877760089.jpg

That's for the telescope.

For the observer, there are certain, pricey filters to help, along with something like this over the head and shoulders...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/140554065@N05/46996552441/in/dateposted-public/

Have you ever owned and/or operated a Newtonian before...

http://www.astro-baby.com/astrobaby/help/collimation-guide-newtonian-reflector/

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6 hours ago, mikeDnight said:

The 8" Newtonian is a great all round scope capable of giving great visual views and great images. Alternatively, if you like the versatility and ease of use of your refractor with its wide fields, you might consider selling your 102AR and your 127 Maksutov, and buy a 102mm ED apo refractor. Such a scope will give you both wide field and high power lunar & planetary views, along with some very contrasty deep sky views. An ED refractor will also produce pin point star images without the blue colour fringing produced by your achromat.  

 

Run the ED102 on either a HEQ5 or 6 mount

I am currently using an ED80 on a EQ5 mount

Recently got the Wi-Fi adaptor for EQ mounts

Download SynScan APP to operate to your mobile phone or tablet

John

 

Skywatcher ED80.jpg

Screenshot SynScan APP.jpg

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Hi all, I've been considering buying two scopes. One for moon, solar and planetary and one for deep sky (visual and astrophotography).

But if a 102mm ED apo refractor can do both well then I may consider that instead. Can anyone confirm this would be a good choice 

and provide some links for makes and models to look at? I will be using an EQ6 mount. 

 

**Actually I was going to buy three scopes. 1. A 150p Mak for Planets/Moon.  2. A 80mm Refractor for DSO.   3. A Newtonian for ISS capture**  

Edited by Snoopy71

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While you can probably achieve a broad range of wide fov to a big zoom with the 102 depending on your eyepiece and Barlow setup and can be good depending on the quality of them it seems the larger the Diamater the better for deep sky stuff so a 8in or 10 in reflector would be better for that it seems.  I think the min reason I and many like the mak or a SCT telescope is because it's compact as mine gives 1900mm focal range which is more than twice the zoom of my 102 yet it's a fraction of its length.  From what I'm understanding you can see see almost any object with the 102 but with a larger reflector it will just be brighter and stand out more. So I think of the 3 types, the mak is least needed but good for portability if you want that or don't want to deal with using Barlow and eyepieces that may be pricy to achieve good seeing on the 102 as you would see on the mak.  So maybe all 3 types can have there time and place when it would be best to use them especially depending on the quality of eyepeices and Barlows you have.  I think in the end a telescope is a telescope and the main thing that will give you the best experience is the eyepiece so if you want the best wow factor I'd get a wide fov with a big exit opening not sure what that's called but the round glass you look through because some can be tiny and some, are large that I feel makes it. More pleasant to see through.  I just got into this hobby and now have the Mak and the 102 and already considering getting a 8in reflector too if I didn't have any and ated to save money I'd probably be happy with only a 102 or 127 or 150 refractor. 

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