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Astronomer242

Which Telescope is good for deep sky astrophotography?

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A camera's sensor, its "eye", is far more sensitive than the human eye.  For one, the camera will gather more light over time, and for your images, making them brighter and more detailed.  The seeing of different colours of and within the objects is also realised.  The human eye doesn't mind so much if the telescope shakes and wobbles, but a camera most certainly does.  The camera must be trained on to the object for the duration of the exposure, held rigidly in position, and with no shakes and wobbles.  Else, the images will be blurred.  When imaging, think of a small telescope, and a LARGE mount...

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/pro-series/sky-watcher-evostar-72ed-ds-pro-ota.html

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/skywatcher-mounts/skywatcher-heq5-pro-synscan.html

...for examples.

The Sky-Watcher 130P-DS is also a viable astrograph, and on an EQ5-class equatorial.  Have a look at this thread...

It is more work-intensive however imaging with a Newtonian, versus a suitable refractor. 

Unlike the human eye, a camera's sensor does not require large apertures with which to image, as the camera collects plenty of light on its own.

Edited by Alan64

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1 hour ago, Alan64 said:

Else, the images will be blurred.  When imaging, think of small telescope, and a LARGE mount...

Fully agree!

This image was taken with a 72ED (not the SW, but the TS/Sharpstar f5.5 one) on my HEQ5, guided with the ASI120 through a 50mm guidescope.

First time I imaged with this setup, so I did not try without IDAS LPS filter, hence some colors have been cut Out. Will try without next time. 

 

20190130_094843.jpg

 

Look at the HUGE field of view obtained at 320 mm (used the 0,8 reducer / flattener). 

Edited by FaDG
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1 minute ago, FaDG said:

Fully agree! This image was taken with a 72ED (not the SW, but the TS/Sharpstar f5.5 one) on my HEQ5, guided with the ASI120 through a 50mm guidescope.

First time I imaged with this setup, so I did not try without IDAS LPS filter, hence some colors have been cut Out. Will try without next time. 

 

20190130_094843.jpg

Now, that is a most satisfactory image.

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I guess you are eager to get started in Imaging, and for sure you will get most useful advice from the SGL members, and hopefully get you ready to go.   You were asked about the budget you have at your disposal, but you might not wish to reveal that online.It's entirely up to you of Course. However, to do serious Deep Sky Astrophotography, the main ingredients are a good telescope, and more importantly, a quality equatorial mount.  There is quite a bit more on the list too, but best to aim for the basic requirements first.

Do you intend to Do your imaging in the open or your own garden. If so,you need a good space to place the mount on it's tripod with a good safe space around it in order to walk around it without bumping into it.

Don't be too hasty with spending your money on this.  Think carefully about your purchases,and seek advice from here before committing your hard earned brass.

It's possible to build yourself a motorized portable mount to carry a DSLR camera and a  suitable lens. This arrangement can track the stars accurately for several minutes, and produce some really beautiful images. Many on this forum have done this, and I'm sure some sample images could be shown. Many famous Comets have been imaged by this method too.

Good luck with your progress.

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19 minutes ago, barkis said:

tI's possible to build yourself a motorized portable mount to carry a DSLR camera and a  suitable lens. This arrangement can track the stars accurately for several minutes, and produce some really beautiful images. Many on this forum have done this, and I'm sure some sample images could be shown. Many famous Comets have been imaged by this method.

Here's a single 180s exposure with Canon 1100d 50mm lens home made manual barndoor mount. Comet Lovejoy.

IMG_9182 180 cr.png

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A fine example of budget AP.  Happy-Kat

My days with our local Astro. Society  were the most pleasing when these wide field slide shows were presented by various members. Many were produced with the Barn Door mount,some with more sophisticated ones, but the imaging quality varied little.

Ron.

 

Edited by barkis

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