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Would it be ok to look through my bedroom window or would the glass affect the image....Im new to this thanks 

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You certainly can if that's your only option. However, you are correct it would affect the image. As the light passes through the window glass it would be slightly distorted and scattered - something that might not be immediately visible to the naked eye but would be magnified by whatever instrument you use.

Another problem would be thermal currents from central heating, boiler outlets etc adding to the distortion. There's no substitute for getting your gear outside but if you have no choice then have at it 😀

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Having your scope outside and properly cooled will give the best performance :smiley:

 

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I'll admit I do alot of through the thermopane terrestrial and celestial observing, mostly wildlife the moon and bright planets but have done lunar eclipses and some brighter dso. I am gifted to have large windows and comfortable chairs with several telescopes close by and ready to go so its easy to get the lazies and have a look see. As others have noted reflection, scatter and glass quality have an effect on views but I keep my expectations within that know and make sure to keep the windows clean especially just before the winter freeze prevents that happening. 

Most of my observing is done on the driveway or at one of many local darksites and in the heat of summer I always observe from the grass as the driveway does not cool until late in the night and those rising thermals distort the views, the window observing I mostly do in the dead of winter as I get much lazier and fatter in that season.

               Best of Luck 🙂

                          Freddie...

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The only advice I can give when doing astronomy through Windows is to turn of automatic updating. Seems to break mine on a regular basis....

(I'll get my coat)

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32 minutes ago, AngryDonkey said:

The only advice I can give when doing astronomy through Windows is to turn of automatic updating. Seems to break mine on a regular basis....

(I'll get my coat)

Boom boom 😄

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53 minutes ago, AngryDonkey said:

The only advice I can give when doing astronomy through Windows is to turn of automatic updating. Seems to break mine on a regular basis....

(I'll get my coat)

Observing with a tripod mounted laptop and built in webcam using Windows would be a trick...be much easier to just look out the window though and you wouldent get as many hecklers 😉

Edited by SIDO

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Looking through a window is better than not looking at all!

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If the window is of an optical-flatness, and the front of the telescope was pressed against the glass, the one perfectly perpendicular to the other, then I would expect very little detriment to the images.

Think of a climate-controlled room, in the shape of a sphere, and with a motorised base.  The optically-flat pane of the only window, and the telescope pressed against it, could then aim at any part of the sky.

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2 hours ago, Alan64 said:

If the window is of an optical-flatness, and the front of the telescope was pressed against the glass, the one perfectly perpendicular to the other, then I would expect very little detriment to the images.

That's what can be done with Baader's Turbo Film except it's not optical glass but of the same quality, and much, much cheaper. 

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