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Stu

Hubble capture of beautiful SN remnant

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Wow! A bit better than you can do with your smartphone Stu?

Chris

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5 minutes ago, chiltonstar said:

Wow! A bit better than you can do with your smartphone Stu?

Chris

Give me time Chris, give me time ??????

 

More seriously, it is one of the more beautiful objects I've seen i think.

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I like it. it reminds me of when I saw someone blowing glass on a school trip many years ago. 

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I'm getting my first good views of the LMC recently and a stunning sight it is too, especially the Tarantula Nebula.

I presume even my 12 inch Dob is not going to be able to see this feature even on a good night ?

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Wow. If onIy could catch a few of those photons in my scope....

Is that circular shape the result of looking at a thin sphere of gas in cross-section or is it a true ring structure?  

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1 hour ago, AstroCiaran123 said:

Is that circular shape the result of looking at a thin sphere of gas in cross-section or is it a true ring structure?  

I'm pretty sure it is a sphere of gas and the ring is from looking at the cross section of it.

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6 minutes ago, Stu said:

I'm pretty sure it is a sphere of gas and the ring is from looking at the cross section of it.

Yes, I'd have thought so.  Perhaps a shell might be more accurate than a sphere, but who knows?

If you imagine it as the surface of a bubble though, with light being emitted in all directions by each molecule of gas, there are obviously going to be more molecules close to our line of sight near the edges than there are in the centre (just as there are more if we look out to space close to the horizon from Earth compared with the zenith), so the edges appear brighter than the centre making it look like a ring.

James

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