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Heyyy its meee kronos and i have been wondering about getting a filter...I really want the best contrast and brightness i can on my nebulas(i want to view M42 M57 M27 M31  M81 M82 and lots more) with my future 8" dob. Is this filter really going to help me?

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/uhc-oiii-visual-filters/es_uhc_filter_125.html

If it just a matter of quality of the filter itself  can you suggest a better one in the same price range?

Or will not the uhc filter help me in general .IF so can you reccomend another one?

Also is this         https://www.firstlightoptics.com/uhc-oiii-visual-filters/uhc-filter.html         this       https://www.firstlightoptics.com/uhc-oiii-visual-filters/es_uhc_filter_125.html        https://www.firstlightoptics.com/uhc-oiii-visual-filters/baader-uhc-s-filter.html               this better?

Edited by Kronos831
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UHC filters are very useful for viewing emission nebulae so great for M42, 27, 57.  They let through OIII and Ha whilst cutting out a significant amount of light from other wavelengths.  A UHC filter doesn't help with broadband targets such as galaxies.  Whilst they will block sodium street light glow they will block some wavelengths useful for broadband targets.  

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The best budget filters are probably the Castel brand but FLO dont stock those. The Orion Ultrablock and the Telescope Services UHC are also good UHC filters that don't cost too much. The Explore Scientific ones might be OK as well.

These deep sky filters are not all to the same specification in terms of band pass width (odd but true) so you need to do some research because some will perform better than others.

Personally, faced with a choice of just the ones you list, I would probably go for the Explore Scientific O-III filter to use with a 200mm dobsonian.

 

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hmmm intresting.. just to understand. Why not get the uhc filter instead of the OIII as the UHC also lets OIII and H wavelenghts get through?
Also which is best for Orion's nebula The dumbbell nebula the ring nebula ,hercules global cluster and maybe some other galaxies?(my most gonna-be viewed objects)

Sorry for asking. Its just one of you suggested the UHC where as the other Suggested OIII so i am really keen to find the difference between the 2 to broaden my knowledge about filters in general

 

Edited by Kronos831
EDIT* Orion nebula is my priority*

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It's the wavelengths that are not admitted by the filter get through that make the difference.

I prefer an O-III where just the O-III line is permitted by the filter because it makes a really big impact on some objects. Most of the ones that you list I prefer to observe without a filter. A UHC does make some difference to them though.

You will find that different people offer different opinions because experiences and preferences vary.

The link that Gerry/Jetstream has posted is worth a read. I've also attached a good piece on them:

0805_nebula_filters.pdf

I know you are in a hurry to purchase but it is worth understanding how these things work.

 

 

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