Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_terminator_challenge_winners.thumb.jpg.6becf44442bc7105be59da91b2bee295.jpg

Recommended Posts

Second attempt at astrophotography with my canon 1300D untracked (first was orion ). Shot under dark skies of himachal pradesh (India). 

Stacking done in DSS and processing in Gimp.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. especially regarding the trees at the bottom.

Total exposure time - 20*20 seconds

Shot with - Canon EOS 1300D (untracked) (unmodded)

Flats and Biased frames included

 

milky way 2.png

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice start. 

The problem with the foreground is that it doesn't move and the stars do. DSS has lined up the stars very nicely, as it would, but has left the ground blurred.

Take a look at this video and see what Sequator could do for you - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ql4bEnJc4hE

Himachal Pradesh looks to be very dark.

Dave.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Knight of Clear Skies said:

Very good result for an untracked shot with a crop-sensor DSLR, shows the brown dust nicely. What f-stop was this taken at please?

f/3.5 at with a stock 18-55 mm lens set to 18mm

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, davew said:

Nice start. 

The problem with the foreground is that it doesn't move and the stars do. DSS has lined up the stars very nicely, as it would, but has left the ground blurred.

Take a look at this video and see what Sequator could do for you - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ql4bEnJc4hE

Himachal Pradesh looks to be very dark.

Dave.

Thanks for the suggestion man, I would use sequator to stack my next target.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you guys suggest a cheap lens for my camera. I think it's time to retire the stock lens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 24/01/2019 at 13:26, harshit8 said:

Can you guys suggest a cheap lens for my camera. I think it's time to retire the stock lens.

I've been thinking ..... are you sure your lens needs retiring after only two Astro images ? :)  I do realise that it's a slower lens than some but still.

There are one or two affordable lenses out there but I'm afraid I've not used most of them. Some friends of mine use the Samyang 14mm f2.8 and get great results. On your APSC camera it would give a field of view near 24mm on an FF camera. I hear good things about the older Tokina zooms of either 11 - 20 or 11 - 16 both f2.8. They give a FOV of near 18mm. I know the Tamron 15 - 30 f2.8 lens is good but it's not exactly cheap.

I don't know what the second hand market is like in Northern India but I imagine it won't be easy to return a lens if it turns out to be less than perfect.

If you live in  Himachal Pradesh how about taking some starry night time water fall photos or maybe some around the Gobind Sagar Lake ? It looks lovely round there ( Isn't Google Earth wonderful ? :) ) 

I hope some Canon users see this thread and can help you more than me !

Dave.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 25/01/2019 at 21:21, davew said:

I've been thinking ..... are you sure your lens needs retiring after only two Astro images ? :)  I do realise that it's a slower lens than some but still.

There are one or two affordable lenses out there but I'm afraid I've not used most of them. Some friends of mine use the Samyang 14mm f2.8 and get great results. On your APSC camera it would give a field of view near 24mm on an FF camera. I hear good things about the older Tokina zooms of either 11 - 20 or 11 - 16 both f2.8. They give a FOV of near 18mm. I know the Tamron 15 - 30 f2.8 lens is good but it's not exactly cheap.

 I don't know what the second hand market is like in Northern India but I imagine it won't be easy to return a lens if it turns out to be less than perfect.

If you live in  Himachal Pradesh how about taking some starry night time water fall photos or maybe some around the Gobind Sagar Lake ? It looks lovely round there ( Isn't Google Earth wonderful ? :) ) 

I hope some Canon users see this thread and can help you more than me !

Dave.

Thanks Dave btw i do not live in himachal. I live in Delhi which is a heavily light polluted city. So I have to travel a lot to get some dark skies. 

I would test the limits of my lens and then choose the new one as the need comes. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Panda Alvin
      Attention: The quality of this video here has been reduced due to file size restriction. A slightly better version can be found unlisted on YouTube (308mb).  

      Description:
      A series of time-lapse short videos set in different locations within South Hampshre at night. All scenes were taken between a Bortle 4-5 area, and each clip equates to 5-6 hours in real time. Please check your volume as this video contains music.

      Equipment / Software:
      Canon 550D
      Tokina AT-X 11mm - 20mm
      Vixen Polarie
      Adobe Lightroom
      Adobe Premier Pro

      Special Thanks:
      Alexander Blu - Background Music
       
      ====================
      Note: My first time producing a proper time-lapse video. Unfortunately the amount of noise and hot pixels were much worser than expected when I reached the video editing stage, and I need to learn how to apply darks against individual frames en masse. I am not personally satisfied with the final quality, but still thought I should share with what I have on here.

      Please feel free to leave a comment, critique, suggestions and guidance on here, thanks!
    • By Matty_C
      Hello all,
      I have just joined and have been looking around, and putting in various searches to find the answer to my question(s).
      I have already found some valuable information, but i can't find a specific answer to a question i have relating to exposure times.
      I have shot the milky way several times before, from a tripod and a wide angle lens. I am aware of and understand the "500 rule" and that worked fine for me at first when i was shooting with my Canon 6D Mark II. When i moved over to the Sony A7III i noticed significant trailing using the same rule and that led me to the NPF rule (Via the photopills app incase people dot know).
      I am heading back to Tenerife once again in about 6 weeks time and want to buy a star tracker so i can get some really detailed images.
      I have done a fair bit of research and in principle, the whole thing doesn't seem to be too daunting or difficult.
      I have purchased the Polar Scope Align Pro app so i can align Polaris as accurately as possible, i will practise putting the unit together and familiarising myself with the different parts etc, but it is the exposure times that i do not understand.
      My best glass is the Carl Ziess 50mm F/1.4 Planar, the 18mm F/2.8 Batis, the Sigma 35mm F/1.4 Art & the IRIX 15mm F/2.4 Blackstone.
      I currently do not own, nor have i ever used a tracker, and I cannot find any information relating to which aperture, ISO and Shutter length any of these focal lengths should or could be shot at.
      Is there anything similar to the 500 rule or NPF rule that relates to using a tracker with varied focal lengths? or is it just a case of stepping the lens down for sharpness and then trial and error?
      Thanks in advance,
       
      Matt.
       
       
       
       
       
    • By eshy76
      Hi everyone!
      I was lucky enough to spend Easter in Mauritius and managed to get a night of imaging in despite the tropical night time clouds! As someone who lives in the Northern hemisphere, the Carina nebula has always been a target I've coveted, but during my holiday, I also loved Crux as prominent constellation in the Southern sky. So when I ran into polar alignment issues with my Skyguider Pro, I decided to play it safe and go for a wider field, capturing both those targets rather than focusing purely on Carina as was my original goal.
      This was shot from my father in law's rooftop in Bonne Terre, Vacoas, Mauritius and my basic polar alignment meant significant field rotation, but I still got some usable data. Cropped, processed and finally upsampled.
      Data was shot at f/2.8 with a 50mm lens, unguided on an unmodified Sony a6500. 174 lights at 30 secs each = 1.4 hours of integration. Bortle 5.
      From the colours it looks like these objects sit right on the disc of the Milky Way and I know there is more in the picture I haven't mentioned!
      Thanks for looking!

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.