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A tale of two implants


stargazerlily
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Did my first observing this last week following my cataract operation 3 weeks ago, mainly on the sun and the moon, the view through my right eye is now much sharper than it was before, and I can make out more detail. Interestingly whites now appear much whiter than they did before, and the view through my left eye (which I might require operating on at some point) in comparison displays a yellow-brownish hue, a bit like the old sepia photos you used to get.

Unfortunately Taurus is now quite low down in the west before it gets properly dark, so can't really carry out two tests I was hoping to, of how many of the Pleiades I could see with the naked eye, and how easily I could see the crab nebula visually through my telescopes. Previously I could only just make out the crab nebula visually through my 14in reflector, and couldn't see it at all with my 127mm  refractor, although light pollution is probably a more significant limiting factor.

I still can't however make out the Mizar and Alcor double with the naked eye, which I used to find quite easy in my youth, and when I could also make out 8 of the Pleiades, but skies were much less light polluted some 50 years ago.

John

 

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I had my post operative eye test at the opticians yesterday following on from my cataract operation, although I am still very slightly short sighted in my right eye (now -0.5 dioptre, previously -3.25), interestingly I now have zero astigmatism in this eye (previously + 1.25 dioptre), although I'm fairly certain that thery did not use a torric implant to specifically correct astigmatism. Having zero astigmatism in this my observing eye, may be another reason why the moon appeared so much sharper that it did before.

The optician also said that the yellowish brown hue which I mentioned in my previous post is quite usual with ageing, normally you don't notice it as it tends to affect both eyes equally.

John

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I had my bilateral laser iridotomy done today.  Wasn't looking forward to it, but it wasn't too bad.  Have to use eyedrops for two weeks and no contact lenses meanwhile.

Fingers crossed this has done what it is supposed to.

Carole 

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  • 8 months later...

Evening all, hope you've all had a fantastic Christmas.

My OP was entitled ... "A tale of two implants".  This is the squeal ... "A tale of two lasers".   

Yep, not long after having my two cataract operations both my eyes started to cloud over again.  It was like being inside a car looking through a steamed-up windscreen!!  Started approx 6 months after the original operations (which was a bit on the early side according to my specialist).  So a few months ago I went off to see the specialist again who diagnosed cataracts in the lens capsules (the bits that were not replaced in my original operation).  I think the correct term is Posterior Capsule Opacification (PCO).

The solution ... a series of blasts from a YAG laser in both eyes to cut away a small hole in the back of the lens capsule (it's the same process as drilling a series of small holes around a circle to make a larger hole in wood or metal etc.).  The small bit that is cut out sinks to the the bottom of eye ball.  Like with the original operations, the result was instant (the time it took to walk from the treatment room to the eye test room).  Perfect vision again.  Hopefully that should be it ... no more sequels (fingers crossed).

Happy New Year

Pete

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4 hours ago, stargazerlily said:

Evening all, hope you've all had a fantastic Christmas.

My OP was entitled ... "A tale of two implants".  This is the squeal ... "A tale of two lasers".   

Yep, not long after having my two cataract operations both my eyes started to cloud over again.  It was like being inside a car looking through a steamed-up windscreen!!  Started approx 6 months after the original operations (which was a bit on the early side according to my specialist).  So a few months ago I went off to see the specialist again who diagnosed cataracts in the lens capsules (the bits that were not replaced in my original operation).  I think the correct term is Posterior Capsule Opacification (PCO).

The solution ... a series of blasts from a YAG laser in both eyes to cut away a small hole in the back of the lens capsule (it's the same process as drilling a series of small holes around a circle to make a larger hole in wood or metal etc.).  The small bit that is cut out sinks to the the bottom of eye ball.  Like with the original operations, the result was instant (the time it took to walk from the treatment room to the eye test room).  Perfect vision again.  Hopefully that should be it ... no more sequels (fingers crossed).

Happy New Year

Pete

Wow! lucky there was a fix!

Louise

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