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stargazerlily

A tale of two implants

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I've not posted on here for over a year now ... here is the reason why.

In October 2017 I sold all of my astro-equipment ... scopes, books, filters ... power packs ... the lot.  I decided to sell my gear for two reasons.  The first was that I was becoming more involved in other things ... also I needed the money to fund car repairs ... and I had lost all of my motivation for all things astro (oh, hang on, that's three reasons). At the time I was struggling to do the basic stiff like focusing my scope on stars and planets.  I was wearing glasses at the time, and had been since primary school.  Without my glasses, I just could not focus on anything ... with my glasses it was a major struggle.  In short, it was just no fun any more.  

Forward to April 2018 ... a regular 6 month visit to the opticians.  The optician was concerned about my deteriorating eye sight. My right eye was significantly worse than it was 6 months previous.  I could have gone along and splashed out several hundred quid on new specs with stronger prescriptions .... but luckily he referred me to a specialist.  So off I went.  Less than two minutes into the examination the specialist diagnosed a particularly bad cataract in my right eye and also one in my left eye.   The diagnosis explained a lot ... and I began to wonder what might have caused the deterioration (according to the optician I'm a bit on the young side to get a bad cataract).  

Forward to October 2018 ... cataract operation on my right eye.   The difference was ... and still is ... utterly amazing, totally breath taking.  From not being able to see anything long distance before the operation to seeing pin points of light that are stars in the heavens a day or so after the operation  I won't bore you with the details of the operation (as some may be squeamish) ... needless to say it is a bit of an eye opener.    

November 2018 ... operation on my left eye.  To be honest, not as dramatic a change compared to the right eye (that's actually a known physiological response ... doing the worse one first dramatically increases the positive response).  I can see long distance in focus but still have a few issues with the left eye.

Now when I look into the dark sky without glasses, I see stars as they are meant to be seen ... pin pricks of light.  The down side (if there is one) ... having clear implants has increased my light sensitivity.  Seeing stars is fantastic but car head lights at night, especially when coming straight towards you, can be a bit awkward.

Do I miss not having my gear anymore ... TBH, yes ... Am I going to buy some new gear ... probably not as the lack-of-cash situation has not improved.   I still have my trusty Canon D1000, a descent tripod and a nifty-fifty lens.  I've a faint hankering to do some more wide field shots in the future.

Pete

 

Edited by stargazerlily
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I was diagnosed with a cataract in my right eye last May, I had suspected something was wrong for some months previously, as my vision through an eyepiece was starting to get cloudy, and I was getting increasingly short sighted in this eye. I was however informed by the optician at the time that it was not suffiently bad for a cataract operation to be funded by the NHS.

In December I was aware that it was getting worse and arranged another eye test, I explained to the optician that it was causing me problems when viewing through my telescope, and was then informed that this would probably be sufficient reason to justify the NHS funding the operation, and I am currently awaiting an appointment at the treatment centre.

Having read other reports of the positive outcomes, I am therefore hoping that my astronomical vision will be much improved following the operation.

John

Edited by johnturley
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Great to hear.

I was told a good 2 years ago that I was developing cataracts.  My recent appointment said they had got worse though I am totally unaware of them, but I will need operations in the future and like the last poster was told that my astronomy hobby would get them done sooner than normal.

I am however going to wait until I start to notice the problem myself.  Meanwhile I have been told it can affect my colour perception, so I rely on my astro friends to tell me if my images are too saturated.

Carole 

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What a great story with a happy ending.  Hope you get out there and take some shots with the Canon.

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So pleased for you, being able to see properly is something we all take for granted until things start to go wrong.
Like several posters above I've been told eventually I'll need an operation. At my last eye test I asked the optician to speculate how long before he would recommend the operation and was told at least five years. I don't notice a problem at present.

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I don't have that problem, at least not yet but I do have other problems...

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3 hours ago, stargazerlily said:

needless to say it is a bit of an eye opener.

Love it!

After my left retina decided it didn't fancy remaining attached to the back of my peeper, the surgery to laser it back on will lead to an inevitable cataract. A scleral band has also left me massively short sighted that is barely corrected with a mega prescription. My right eye is the polar opposite and borderline 6/3 which means without glasses bino vision is laughable. Catching anything thrown at me is pure guesswork 😂

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My partner was diagnosed with cataracts by this hobby. She was complaining our microscope lens was dirty, then the next week she said the same about ALL my eyepieces. So I suggested a visit to the doctor...

Edited by Ags
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Pete,

Great news about the improvement in your outlook!

Have you considered your local astronomy society? I think most have society owned scopes as loaners

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I have cataracts too - my low light vision is rubbish and any glare is horrid. They don't get better do they... Luckily they don't interfere too much yet. I'm down to see my optician (Specsavers!) annually now instead of the once every two years. When I might get any actual treatment is anybody's guess!

Louise

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Fantastic! I'm happy to hear the procedures were a success for you. My mother had one eye done but it wasn't good, so she refused to do the other one.

I have to say, one of my biggest phobia's is having something done in my eyes. I look at it as a last resort.

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Thank you everyone for your kind comments.   

Good luck with your operation John.  Mine was a bit scary as it was done under local anaesthetic.  Very strange.  I just kept on saying to myself ... tea and cake afterwards. 

One thing that I did think about was whether looking through the telescope at bright objects such as the moon, Jupiter etc. actually caused the cataract in my right eye to get worse.   I never did ask the consultant about that.  Might do that next week when I see him again about my left eye issues.

Pete

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As I understand it, it's UV light that causes cataracts.

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48 minutes ago, Gina said:

As I understand it, it's UV light that causes cataracts.

And any blue light too 

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47 minutes ago, Gina said:

As I understand it, it's UV light that causes cataracts.

It probably contributes but... Do people who spend a lot of time outside (without uv sunglasses) get cataracts quicker? Must be genetic influences too, I think. I'm sure mine are worsening at a rate parallel to my hair turning grey/white! Ha ha.
Oh, I think blue light is believed to damage the retina? I have my monitor set to shift towards the red end of the spectrum after sunset :)

Louise

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3 hours ago, stargazerlily said:

Thank you everyone for your kind comments.   

Good luck with your operation John.  Mine was a bit scary as it was done under local anaesthetic.  Very strange.  I just kept on saying to myself ... tea and cake afterwards. 

One thing that I did think about was whether looking through the telescope at bright objects such as the moon, Jupiter etc. actually caused the cataract in my right eye to get worse.   I never did ask the consultant about that.  Might do that next week when I see him again about my left eye issues.

Pete

Thanks Pete

I must admit that I'm a bit nervous about it, I expect mine will be done under local aneasthetic too, but if my vision improves as much as yours did, it will be well worth it.

John

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Hi, Pete, and welcome back.

Great news about your improved eyesight.

No great rush for new gear. A few widefield shots with your canon will no doubt start to lure you down the slippery slope in due course ... :evil4:

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So many people with same hubby and same issues... Am beginning to think there is a connection with peering through a telescope and cataracts... 🤣

I am also four eyed too ( as people who use glasses are refared to in Nigeria), astigmatism, bt I can stil use my telescope with out my glasses.

Am happy for you guys that had happy ending, I wish you better health all round

Edited by louizi
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I too have had  a cataract procedure on my right eye, and I endorse your reaction regarding the amazing result of this procedure. I'm patiently awaiting for March 26th. at 8:45am, when my left eye will hopefully be restored that miracle that great vision provides us with.  I was so grateful for skills of these specialists, that are able to do this magical work.

The wonder is, how quickly the procedure takes, I  was wheeled in, and wheeled out again, in what seemed like only 10 minutes.

The saying goes,. " The Best Things In Life Are Free."   That, without doubt, applies here.

Ron.

 

 

 

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Good luck with your second op Ron.

I had my left eye done in mid November last year.  My eyes are quite sensitive with my left more sensitive than my right.  Needless to say the op was a little more involved compared to the op on my right eye.  I was told a very important trick ... keep both eyes wide open under the covers.  If you close one (I was closing my right eye under the cover) it almost forces the other eye to close.  I'm back at the specialist on Monday as I do have a slight issue with my left eye. 

Pete

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I've now got a date for my cataract operation of 15 March.

Partly because of my interest in astromomy, I opted for the standard monofocal lens optimised for distant vision, as besides the fact that the NHS will not fund having a multifocal lens (I would have to pay for this privately), I thought that the latter, which is similar to bifocal or varifocal glasses, might not result in me seeing star images as sharp as with the former.

John

Edited by johnturley

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2 minutes ago, johnturley said:

I've now got a date for my cararact operation of 15 March.

Partly because of my interest in astromomy, I opted for the standard monofocal lens optimised for distant vision, as besides the fact that the NHS will not fund having a multifocal lens (I would have to pay for this privately), I thought that the latter, which is similar to bifocal or varifocal glasses, might not result in me seeing star images as sharp as with the former.

John

Good luck - all the best

Louise

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Great story, made me smile.

Have you considered night driving glasses like these if the glare affects you?  I have a pair and, whilst skeptical at first, for me they do work. 

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My partner Tim had the vari-focal lenses on the NHS.  Afterwards he could see well at a distance and also to read close up.  He was delighted.  Apparently, they are soft lenses that change shape like the real thing when you are young.  This was at a specialist eye clinic in a local hospital with a renowned reputation.

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My wife had this procedure done on Wednesday of this week after cancelling a previous appointment due to worry about it. She is already marveling at the improvement just a couple of days since, perfect vision at a distance and very little discomfort. Big relief for me as well as I had done my best to persuade her to go through with it. Now looking forward to mine when the time comes!.   😀

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