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Here is an image of Mars I made on 9 Jan this year, with a C8 SE, and ASI120MC camera.  The images are rather small (around 7" dia).  Mars is now much higher in the sky than at opposition, so it seemed worth taking a few farewell images as it diminishes in size. Captured with Sharpcap.

I did not use the ADC - the images are corrected for AD in the processing in Registax.  This is from a run of 3000 images.  I have included a x3 Photoshop zoom of the same image to indicate the size of Mars at opposition on the same scale.  I was quite pleased to record some surface detail, corresponding with the position of Syrtis Major.  If I'd had more time, I could have tried some images using a Barlow lens. I have just discovered that I can unscrew the lens section from a Skywatcher x2 Barlow and screw it onto the 1.25" nosepiece of the ASI120MC, which will give a more modest zoom (I think).

MarsJan9-19_48_08.jpgMars9Jan19_41_15.jpg

Marszoom19_48_08.jpg

Edited by Cosmic Geoff
Barlow etc
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Yes, Mars is nice and high now, unfortunately really small also, nice shots!

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Definitely some albedo detail showing in the smaller images.

As far as post processing out AD; Damian Peach says in his article that although you can improve the effects of AD in post processing it does not remove everything that a good ADC will remove at the time of imaging - if correctly set up.

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Nice images with some fine detail. I am woefully short on planetary imaging and will make a serious attempt this year.

Steve

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  • Similar Content

    • By Cosmic Geoff
      Here is an image of Jupiter, taken around 6am on 15 Feb with my C8, ASI120MC, +ADC, processed in Registax6 from around 30% of 3000 frames.
      I am fairly pleased with it considering that the altitude of the planet was only about 12 deg. and the seeing looked bad when I tried to focus on a star.  And it shows the Great Red Spot.
       

    • By Cosmic Geoff
      I had another go at imaging the shrinking Mars, this time without and with a x2 Barlow lens.  The results are better with the Barlow, which is what one is led to expect.   For whatever reason (probably bad seeing and/or low planets) when I tried a Barlow previously it just made the blur bigger.  Equipment: C8 SE, ASI120MC, x2 Skywatcher kit Barlow element screwed directly into 1.25" barrel of the ZWO camera.   This does seem to give x2 in practice.  I did not use an ADC on the grounds that I shouldn't need one with Mars at an altitude of over 40 degrees.
      3000 image video captured with Sharpcap. Processed in Registax6.  I found that the Sharpcap exposure histogram did not appear to work on such a small image, so had to estimate the exposure.   Yes, optical ADC correction would be better, but the dispersion seemed very small.  Blowing up the image x2 in Registax showed a small colour fringe, which I took out with a single point of correction.
      The images show some surface detail though the contrast is low (if you are using a flatscreen try viewing from below: 🙄)  Mare Sirenum, with Mare Acidalium just discernible foreshortened at upper right. 


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