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The Campaign To Protect Rural England are running another star survey to monitor the spread of Light Pollution- details here:

https://www.cpre.org.uk/what-we-do/countryside/dark-skies/star-count-2019?utm_medium=email&utm_source=engagingnetworks&utm_campaign=campaigns-update-2019-jan&utm_content=Campaigns+Update+2019+Jan

TAKE PART: 2 February - 23 February

Help us reclaim our dark skies

Dark, starry skies are one of the most magical sights the countryside can offer. But light pollution means many of us can’t see the stars. We want to reconnect people with the wonder of our glorious night skies.

You can take part in #StarCount2019 and help us map light pollution, to ensure more of us can enjoy the most magical sight the countryside has to offer.

Our Star Count will take place this February, when we’ll be asking you to look up at the night sky and tell us how many you can see in Orion. You can do this from anywhere in England.

The results will help us to create a new map to show how light pollution affects everybody’s views of the night sky.

 

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Thanks for that, I was wondering when they were going to do another count.

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Well, let's hope the current perpetually cloudy skies relent in February!  One point though with these surveys.  Do they take into account the age and eyesight of the observers?  At age 75 my pupil at full dilation is likely to be around 5mm whereas in a young person it should be nearer 7 mm or larger.  That equates to twice the light grasp for the younger person and almost a full magnitude in star visibility.  So although I have quite dark skies where I live, I'm limited in what I can see naked eye.  One of the reasons why I'm primarily into astrophotography.   So I hope there is an age entry on the report form and that the analysis makes adjustments accordingly.

Cheers,

Peter

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6 hours ago, petevasey said:

Well, let's hope the current perpetually cloudy skies relent in February!  One point though with these surveys.  Do they take into account the age and eyesight of the observers?  At age 75 my pupil at full dilation is likely to be around 5mm whereas in a young person it should be nearer 7 mm or larger.  That equates to twice the light grasp for the younger person and almost a full magnitude in star visibility.  So although I have quite dark skies where I live, I'm limited in what I can see naked eye.  One of the reasons why I'm primarily into astrophotography.   So I hope there is an age entry on the report form and that the analysis makes adjustments accordingly.

Cheers,

Peter

I don't believe this is meant to be a fully scientific survey as there are way to many variables. It's more for public particpation and raising awareness of the issues.

The result of the last survey in 2012

Star-Count-Map-2012.jpg

Edited by laser_jock99

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