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Lead_weight

IC 417, NGC 1907, NGC 1931 - All-in-one.

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Spent the last three nights imaging these three objects. Managed to get them all in the same frame of my ES 102mm FCD100 scope. Pretty happy with how it turned out. I would have liked to have grabbed a little more SII data. When I originally captured it, I thought I might only have two clear nights, so I imaged it as HA/OIII. Turns out there's almost no OIII. On the third night, clouds were supposed to roll in about 4am, cutting the imaging session short, but it stayed clear the whole night, and I got a full night of data with the exception that I got a late start due to technical issues when I first started imaging.

The ASI1600's halos are rearing their ugly heads on the two brightest stars. I tried to tone them down some by desaturating the colors around both stars...it worked a bit.

Another 15 hours and I could probably get rid of any remaining grain, but just don't have the clear nights to get it done. 15.8 hours total imaging time.

Equipment:

  • Celestron CGX
  • Explore Scientific 102mm FCD100
  • ZWO ASI1600MM-C
  • ZWO Filter Wheel with Astrodon 5nm filters
  • ZWO ASI290MM Mini guide camera 
  • Stellarvue F50G guide scope

IC417.jpg

Edited by Lead_weight
Added total imaging time.
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NGC 1931 is a beautiful object that I mention several times in my new book, Bright and Dark Nebulae that you can find on Amazon.  I discuss it along with NGC 7129 as objects that take a wide range of magnification without lose of the faint nebula.  I first observed it visually in a Tasco 2" f/8 in the 1960s and have observed it with scopes up to 100" like many of the other over 1000 objects discussed in my new book.  The secret to observing many of the supposedly "difficult" nebulae is to do so simply in a dark sky.  Naked eye, small scopes, big scopes and any number of filters are less significant than that of a very dark sky.  Of course, an attitude of not quitting at a first failure is also helpful!  nebulaeman

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That is really nice, Andrew.

I particularly like (what I presume is called) the fish nebula in the top right quadrant.  It's really clear in this picture ... facing towards the left side of the picture with quite a prominent snout, the things I thought might have been lightning strikes emanating from an amorphous cloud at first glance are actually feelers or gills of some sort, there's a dark patch for its eye and its tail forms a v-shape heading towards the right hand side of the picture.

I promise ... I will cut down on the mushrooms!

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