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floastro

My first Saturn & Jupiter

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Posted (edited)

Hi all,

This is my first shots of Saturn and Jupiter taken the last summer with my new ZWO ASI178MC.

Equipment :

-Sky-Watcher Maksutov-Cassegrain Ø150mm /1800mm
-Sky-Watcher NEQ5 PRO Goto mount
-ZWO ASI178MC camera
-ZWO ADC corrector
-Pierro-Astro electric Focuser Focus v2 controlled by the PC station in ASCOM.

-Imaging Software : FireCapture
-Integration Software : Autostakker 3
-Processing Softwares : PRISM v10 / Registax 6 / PhotoShop CS6 / Lightroom 6

- Wide Gammut Monitor for processing : NEC SpectraView Reference 272 (27") calibrated with x-Rite i1 Display Pro colorimeter

 

Saturn :

Sequence of 11,000 images.
8,800 added with a sub-exposure of 88ms/image.

Focal length : 1800mm

1999009651_Sat_221457_250718_ZWOASI178MC_Exposure88_6-Modifier.thumb.jpg.1c41d164d509391715cb4f65873c7e08.jpg

 

 

Jupiter :

Sequence of 6,000 images. 4,800 images added.

The exposure time for each image : 40.7ms.

Focal length : 1800mm

564969457_Jup_250718_ZWOASI178MC_Exposure40_7ms_conv8bitsPRISM_naturel3-Modifier3-Modifier-Modifier2Drizzle4xd.thumb.jpg.be567521dd44c53c07fd6ed72978f3eb.jpg

 

 

_DSC3203_dxo102.thumb.jpg.4eff7fe0b6a41792a4a93b9f32811021.jpg

 

_DSC3218_dxo10.thumb.jpg.0c4fedf4b3873c88d3144d201ecccc7d.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by floastro
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Fantastic images really, and i'm kind of inspired to see you've use the same scope which i use for planetary/lunar, i love it, it really is a planet killer as you demonstrate here. 

You have made us Mak pack members proud lol!

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Wow. 

Great, ultra clear, images but more than that as Sunshine states they really inspire others (especially newbies like myself) to what can be achieved. :thumbright:

Steve

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42 minutes ago, Sunshine said:

Fantastic images really, and i'm kind of inspired to see you've use the same scope which i use for planetary/lunar, i love it, it really is a planet killer as you demonstrate here. 

You have made us Mak pack members proud lol!

Thank you so much ?

I love the Mak scopes ans i love this Mak. Outstanding optics and a very small shifting. A great tube. I've got an ES 2x focal extender but not used at that time because the atmospheric turbulence was too high the last summer with the planets at a low altitude.

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43 minutes ago, teoria_del_big_bang said:

Wow. 

Great, ultra clear, images but more than that as Sunshine states they really inspire others (especially newbies like myself) to what can be achieved. :thumbright:

Steve

He he your welcome ?

Even a small scope can deliver great images ?

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35 minutes ago, bottletopburly said:

 First images of the planets, outstanding well done .

?

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51 minutes ago, teoria_del_big_bang said:

Wow. 

Great, ultra clear, images but more than that as Sunshine states they really inspire others (especially newbies like myself) to what can be achieved. :thumbright:

Steve

Thank you.

Steve, i am a newbie in the planetary imaging. That's only my first shots. I never took planet images before ?

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Very well done, nice scope too...

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Super images of the two planets. :) 

You have some wonderful images on your website.  “The Last Alien North” was an incredible setting to capture The Milky Way. 

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On 07/01/2019 at 00:04, Scooot said:

Super images of the two planets. :) 

You have some wonderful images on your website.  “The Last Alien North” was an incredible setting to capture The Milky Way. 

Thank you Richard.

Oh yes, my picture of King of Wings. I used my Nikon D750 Full Frame with my Samyang 12mm f/2.8 fish-eye AE FF lens. ?

Florent

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