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Barry-Wilson

NGC 1333 - high resolution New Year's delight

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NGC 1333 - A mysterious powerhouse of star formation, as APOD describes: "NGC 1333 is seen in visible light as a reflection nebula, dominated by bluish hues characteristic of starlight reflected by dust. A mere 1,000 light-years distant toward the heroic constellation Perseus, it lies at the edge of a large, star-forming molecular cloud. This striking close-up view spans about two full moons on the sky or just over 15 light-years at the estimated distance of NGC 1333. It shows details of the dusty region along with hints of contrasting red emission from Herbig-Haro objects, jets and shocked glowing gas emanating from recently formed stars. In fact, NGC 1333 contains hundreds of stars less than a million years old, most still hidden from optical telescopes by the pervasive stardust. The chaotic environment may be similar to one in which our own Sun formed over 4.5 billion years ago."

A deep image of this target has been a goal for some time and with e-Eye's dark skies Steve and I have realised our goal with our shared remote rig.  This image is a fine test for the TEC140 and QSI690 at 0.75"/px.  As Olly has remarked, a 5 or 6 inch refractor with small pixels really can compete with a longer FL RC or SCT.  This image has only edges cropped from dithering.

Details:

  • TEC140 with flattener at F7
  • 10 Micron GM2000HPS II UP
  • QSI690wsg-8 with Astrodon filters
  • Lum 57 x 600s; RGB 24 x 600s each channel; 21.5hrs total integration
  • SGP & Pixinsight
  • Data acquisition: Barry Wilson & Steve Milne. Processing: Barry Wilson

Thanks for looking.

NGC1333_LRGB_Final_90_alt.thumb.jpg.01d88289bc9d2531b94d9bb5a0c3557b.jpg

  • Like 34

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That’s awesome. One day I aspire to take images even remotely as good as this. My journey toward such perfection begins the next clear night :) 

  • Like 1

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Another winner Barry / Steve amazing sharp detail.

Dave

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What a fantastic image.  It glows like a burning ember under dark smoke. 

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22 minutes ago, Barry-Wilson said:

NGC 1333 - A mysterious powerhouse of star formation, as APOD describes: "NGC 1333 is seen in visible light as a reflection nebula, dominated by bluish hues characteristic of starlight reflected by dust. A mere 1,000 light-years distant toward the heroic constellation Perseus, it lies at the edge of a large, star-forming molecular cloud. This striking close-up view spans about two full moons on the sky or just over 15 light-years at the estimated distance of NGC 1333. It shows details of the dusty region along with hints of contrasting red emission from Herbig-Haro objects, jets and shocked glowing gas emanating from recently formed stars. In fact, NGC 1333 contains hundreds of stars less than a million years old, most still hidden from optical telescopes by the pervasive stardust. The chaotic environment may be similar to one in which our own Sun formed over 4.5 billion years ago."

A deep image of this target has been a goal for some time and with e-Eye's dark skies Steve and I have realised our goal with our shared remote rig.  This image is a fine test for the TEC140 and QSI690 at 0.75"/px.  As Olly has remarked, a 5 or 6 inch refractor with small pixels really can compete with a longer FL RC or SCT.  This image has only edges cropped from dithering.

Details:

  • TEC140 with flattener at F7
  • 10 Micron GM2000HPS II UP
  • QSI690wsg-8 with Astrodon filters
  • Lum 57 x 600s; RGB 24 x 600s each channel; 21.5hrs total integration
  • SGP & Pixinsight
  • Data acquisition: Barry Wilson & Steve Milne. Processing: Barry Wilson

Thanks for looking.

NGC1333_LRGB_Final_90_alt.thumb.jpg.01d88289bc9d2531b94d9bb5a0c3557b.jpg

Wow 👍👍👍

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It was the beard that did it...  Great image Barry (& Steve).

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46 minutes ago, dannybgoode said:

That’s awesome. One day I aspire to take images even remotely as good as this. My journey toward such perfection begins the next clear night :) 

Thank you. There haven’t been many clear nights in the UK of late; I’ve not imaged from my back garden obs since mid-October 😩.

41 minutes ago, Davey-T said:

Another winner Barry / Steve amazing sharp detail.

Dave

Cheers Dave. This image is definitely from Barry, despite recent confusions 😜😆.

37 minutes ago, tooth_dr said:

What a fantastic image.  It glows like a burning ember under dark smoke. 

Agreed, a veritable Vulcan’s furnace.

Much appreciated dweller25.

11 minutes ago, Kinch said:

It was the beard that did it...  Great image Barry (& Steve).

😆👌🤘👍, Ha Ha! A greying, baldy middle-aged man’s delight!

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15 minutes ago, Kinch said:

It was the beard that did it...  Great image Barry (& Steve).

Just delved deeper into your site Brendan (which is excellent BTW) and saw the photo of you during the Mercury transit, so comment fully appreciated 😆👍.

Your two-pane Jellyfish is a delight, congratulations.

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Thanks Barry. I have had a beard all my adult life....but NOT always this colour 🤨

The Jellyfish is just a single - not two pane. (Just getting used to my larger chip camera....if I don't have to: I NEVER want to try mosaics again 👎. (Simeis 147 was 4 Pane).

Brendan.

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Simply stunning! It’s got an amazing three dimensional feel. You can almost feel the turbulence in those clouds. Phenomenal processing.

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16 minutes ago, Sunshine said:

Geez that’s off the hook beautiful!

&

16 minutes ago, Filroden said:

Simply stunning! It’s got an amazing three dimensional feel. You can almost feel the turbulence in those clouds. Phenomenal processing.

Thank you both. I have been surprised how much detail of the central star forming regions was captured, especially the fine energetic filaments.

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Stunning image - I've seen the object before but never like this - well done!

 I've also never seen the face before ( albeit one with spooky glowing eyes and a rather long nose :) )

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Quite magnificent Barry.  A beautiful target beautifully processed to a level that would justify an APOD.  I have to confess that I've found this one really difficult - and after spending days and days wrestling with processing it I gave up in the end!  Well done!

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Lovely image and a thing of beauty.

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A great target imaged so as to do justice to it. Super job.

This is very similar indeed to the result Yves and I obtained with the 14 inch ODK, confirming, yet again, that there is little to choose between a large amateur reflector and a large amateur refractor. And you have round stars with the refractor instead of our crosses tending towards squares in the middle.

The background sky has a mottled look which bugged my in our image but it's pretty similar to yours so maybe that's just how this dusty region looks. 

Olly

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9 hours ago, MikeODay said:

Stunning image - I've seen the object before but never like this - well done!

 I've also never seen the face before ( albeit one with spooky glowing eyes and a rather long nose :) )

Thanks Mike.  I had to stare for a few minutes thinking "spooky face" but I then saw the face with droopy nose looking left ! Fantastic - our ability to see patterns never ceases to amze.  Thank you for your comments.

58 minutes ago, Petergoodhew said:

Quite magnificent Barry.  A beautiful target beautifully processed to a level that would justify an APOD.  I have to confess that I've found this one really difficult - and after spending days and days wrestling with processing it I gave up in the end!  Well done!

Cheers Peter.  I have imaged NGC1333 widefield and it works well with its surrounding dusty and molecular clouds.  Close-up, hhmm.  I agree that there is a balance to be made as you need sufficient surrounding sky to be able to reveal the structure - too close and it becomes a formless dark vaguely glowing lump.

49 minutes ago, Mr Spock said:

Lovely image and a thing of beauty.

👍

37 minutes ago, ollypenrice said:

A great target imaged so as to do justice to it. Super job.

This is very similar indeed to the result Yves and I obtained with the 14 inch ODK, confirming, yet again, that there is little to choose between a large amateur reflector and a large amateur refractor. And you have round stars with the refractor instead of our crosses tending towards squares in the middle.

The background sky has a mottled look which bugged my in our image but it's pretty similar to yours so maybe that's just how this dusty region looks. 

Olly

Thank you Olly, much appreciated.  I have seen this background texture on many web images during my researches for processing and like you thought it is an effect created by the tenuous gases and dust in the general area (Steve's image posted on ABin is similar as you'd expect from the same dataset, but independent processing).  Stand-by, as Steve and I are just completing a 4 panel mosaic of Gamma Cas' IC59/63 'Breaking Wave' in hommage to your exquisite image of May 2017.

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Posted (edited)
57 minutes ago, ollypenrice said:

A great target imaged so as to do justice to it. Super job.

This is very similar indeed to the result Yves and I obtained with the 14 inch ODK, confirming, yet again, that there is little to choose between a large amateur reflector and a large amateur refractor. And you have round stars with the refractor instead of our crosses tending towards squares in the middle.

The background sky has a mottled look which bugged my in our image but it's pretty similar to yours so maybe that's just how this dusty region looks. 

Olly

I don't quite agree Olly, we never had enough good data of this object in the ODK 14 inch, I looked at it when I re did the image in the FSQ and had no high res RGB data (I took the color data from my full frame which has a pixel scale of 2 arcsec/pixel versus 0.9 for the L)

I see if I can post the 9 hours of L only ... in the mean time ...

31410176967_5a33338a36_c.jpgNGC1333LRGB-PIv4 by Yves, on Flickr

Edited by vdb

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Lovely image; I love the red emission regions and the warm orangey feel to the stars. Interesting comparing the subtle processing differences to Steve's version. 

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Very nice Barry. This remote imaging thing is looking increasingly tempting!

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On 05/01/2019 at 14:05, SamAndrew said:

Lovely image; I love the red emission regions and the warm orangey feel to the stars. Interesting comparing the subtle processing differences to Steve's version. 

Thanks Sam - yes, there's always a difference 😉.

On 07/01/2019 at 18:32, Allinthehead said:

Wonderful image Barry.

Cheers Richard.

22 hours ago, Ikonnikov said:

Very nice Barry. This remote imaging thing is looking increasingly tempting!

It is - I have only managed a handful of subs from home.  Find a like-minded mate (there are advantages to being part of a small team) and start to explore what's possible 😎.

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An exceptional image Barry you must be very pleased with the result of your new high resolution set up. 

For my UK site, I've also found that around the 0.7 arc seconds/pixel seems to be the optimum for extracting the maximum resolution from DSO objects.    

Alan

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On 10/01/2019 at 08:43, alan4908 said:

An exceptional image Barry you must be very pleased with the result of your new high resolution set up. 

For my UK site, I've also found that around the 0.7 arc seconds/pixel seems to be the optimum for extracting the maximum resolution from DSO objects.    

Alan

Much appreciated Alan.

Yes agreed re image scale.  I did briefly experiment with a Atik One 9.0 with my WO 132FLT at F7 which gave me 0.8"/px in summer 2018 and felt the quality of data to be at the seeing limit.  Then Steve and I had the opportunity from an acquaintance at e-Eye to buy his rig and I decided to abandon high resolution imaging from south Devon and take the plunge with another remote rig.  I am glad I did as I haven't even been able to fully utilise the two scopes and one ccd in my home observatory since October 2018 due to weather.  I am even now musing about a widefield rig for the summer nebula (eg WO ZS61 plus a reducer or Vixen 55FL plus reducer) - my heart tells me to give it a go, my brian tells me to not sweat due to the weather!

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