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Grumman

FLO Sky-Watcher DSLR-M48 Ring Adapter has a hidden manual rotator!

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Posted (edited)

Hello all,

 

I just wanted to share something that I recently found out and it has worked for me like a treat!

I have a Sky-Watcher 72ED and the Field Flattener for it. I had to purchase a "special" adapter ring for my DSLR which is actually a Canon Bayonet adapter but instead of a standard T2 threads, it comes with M48 (2") threads so it will fit to the Field Flattener's M48 thread.

I have a fully screwed imaging train which makes it challenging for framing objects properly.

I was thinking of having a manual rotator in the setup so I can rotate the camera and properly frame my targets but, the issue with this scope/field flattener combination is that it does not give you enough focuser travel. By adding a rotator in the solution it would add around 10mm of back-focus meaning that i could never be able to achieve focus with the current setup.

 

I looked closer at my ring adapter that i purchased from FLO and it seems that it has 3 (M2.5) grub screws that seem to be holding something...

I took a screw driver and to my surprise, the grub screws are holding what seems to be a rotation ring!

I have bought some M2.5 thumb screws and presto! - I have a manual rotator built in on the ring adapter and it only costed me £3 for a set of 4 thumb screws from eBay!

 

I hope this post helps someone else who is looking for a manual rotator but they can't afford one (as they cost around £60) or they do not have enough focus travel with their setup.

Sky-Watcher DSLR-M48 Ring Adapter
M2.5 Thumb Screws (pack of 4)

 

IMG_20190103_212424-COLLAGE.jpg.b649a6b1b8c267b05079865b73bcd092.jpg

 

Regards,
Thanasis

Edited by Grumman
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You know I discovered those grub screws too but never made the quantum leap to a potential manual camera rotator.

Very interesting idea and food for thought!

Thank you :)

 

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Posted (edited)

I’d used this rotation method before but fiddled with the Allen key. Those thumbscrews are a neat solution.  

Edited by tooth_dr
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It happens that all the t2 adapters are made that way, it's just a real faff in the dark to use them for rotation. 

Well done for finding some thumb screws that fit. 

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On 03/01/2019 at 21:50, Grumman said:

Hello all,

 

I just wanted to share something that I recently found out and it has worked for me like a treat!

I have a Sky-Watcher 72ED and the Field Flattener for it. I had to purchase a "special" adapter ring for my DSLR which is actually a Canon Bayonet adapter but instead of a standard T2 threads, it comes with M48 (2") threads so it will fit to the Field Flattener's M48 thread.

I have a fully screwed imaging train which makes it challenging for framing objects properly.

I was thinking of having a manual rotator in the setup so I can rotate the camera and properly frame my targets but, the issue with this scope/field flattener combination is that it does not give you enough focuser travel. By adding a rotator in the solution it would add around 10mm of back-focus meaning that i could never be able to achieve focus with the current setup.

 

I looked closer at my ring adapter that i purchased from FLO and it seems that it has 3 (M2.5) grub screws that seem to be holding something...

I took a screw driver and to my surprise, the grub screws are holding what seems to be a rotation ring!

I have bought some M2.5 thumb screws and presto! - I have a manual rotator built in on the ring adapter and it only costed me £3 for a set of 4 thumb screws from eBay!

 

I hope this post helps someone else who is looking for a manual rotator but they can't afford one (as they cost around £60) or they do not have enough focus travel with their setup.

Sky-Watcher DSLR-M48 Ring Adapter
M2.5 Thumb Screws (pack of 4)

 

IMG_20190103_212424-COLLAGE.jpg.b649a6b1b8c267b05079865b73bcd092.jpg

 

Regards,
Thanasis

Just found this.

thanks for sharing, may prove very handy.

 

Thanks again

Tim

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Just done this to mine - had to get the thumbscrews from China though.

Peter

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Grumman.

I have shared this with others on this link; will be very useful.

now to see if FLO do M2.5s

thanks again.

 

Tim

Edited by Cozzy
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@Cozzy My pleasure!

I am glad my experiments are helpful to the community! ;)

Regards,

Thanasis

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