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The first Binocular Sky Newsletter of 2019 is ready. In addition to the usual stuff on DSOs and variable and double stars, this month we have:

  • Uranus still available
  • Comet 46P/Wirtanen fading
  • X Oph brightening
  • Two (difficult) grazing occultations

Here's hoping that 2019 brings us all an abundance of clear, dark skies.

To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month.

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Good stuff as always. Thanks for putting the newsletter together. 

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Just discovered this -- great resource. Thank you!

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