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Hello there! I'd like to start off by saying that I'm completely new at this so please don't get mad if I seem ignorant or don't know things. I recently came across a recommendation to go stargazing with night vision and that seemed like a really cool experience so that's why I'm here now. I wanted to ask whether it's possible to do that while spending less than $100? Obviously since I'm only getting into stargazing I wouldn't need anything too amazing, but I'm wondering whether it'd be very bad with equipment for under $100 and would it instead be better to find someone to lend from.  If it is indeed possible to achieve something fairly decent for a beginner for under $100, what would be your recommendations? Thank you!

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1 hour ago, Ziopliukas said:

Hello there! I'd like to start off by saying that I'm completely new at this so please don't get mad if I seem ignorant or don't know things. I recently came across a recommendation to go stargazing with night vision and that seemed like a really cool experience so that's why I'm here now. I wanted to ask whether it's possible to do that while spending less than $100? Obviously since I'm only getting into stargazing I wouldn't need anything too amazing, but I'm wondering whether it'd be very bad with equipment for under $100 and would it instead be better to find someone to lend from.  If it is indeed possible to achieve something fairly decent for a beginner for under $100, what would be your recommendations? Thank you!

I'm afraid even adding a zero to that number wouldn't get you close, this kit is very expensive. If it were possible at $100 we would all be doing it I suspect! 

Welcome to the forum anyway, there are other ways of enjoying the skies, a good pair of binoculars would probably be your best bet on your budget.

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